Aladdin Boudoir Lamp

250

Here is a nice ALADDIN boudoir lamp. Signed twice and ready to go. Has a 6" shade and stands 14" high, works well. Low priced.

History of Aladdin Lamps

Written by J. W. Courter
"Nearly a century ago, a very small boy on a Nebraska farm read and re-read the Arabian Nights story of Aladdin in a room of darkness but for the flickering yellow light of an open flame "coal oil lamp. " Several years later that boy, grown to manhood, found a lamp that erased the darkness with a soft white light and it was only natural that he named the lamp "Aladdin. " An appropriate name, indeed, for this revolutionary boon to rural America seemed nothing short of magical in the intensity of its light.

"For those who lit the lamp, trimmed its wick and cleaned its chimney, or just enjoyed its friendly glow, the Aladdin lamp recalls many memories of golden childhood. It made learning possible for many boys and girls; made it possible for them to acquire knowledge that helped them realize their dreams and aspirations.

"Later, Aladdin brought this white light to every kind of habitat in every corner of the globe. For many, it has been the only light of their entire life. Even when electricity comes, there are a loyal few who profess to use the electric light only "to find the match" to light their Aladdin. "

V. S. Johnson, Jr
Copyright © 2002 by J. W. Courter
J. W. Courter is professor emeritus, University of Illinois. His avocation is collecting and studying oil lamps. He writes and publishes books about Aladdin lamps.
® The Trademark Aladdin and Lox-On are used under license from Aladdin Industries, LLC.

Victor Johnson founded the Mantle Lamp Company of America in Chicago in 1908 and imported the Practicus incandescent burner from Germany. He obtained the Aladdin trademark in 1908 and sold the first model of the American-made Aladdin lamp in 1909. In 1926 Johnson bought the Lippincott Glass factory in Alexandria, Indiana to make glass lamps, chimneys and shades, changing the name to Aladdin Industries.

Agents were recruited to sell lamps throughout the country and farm land. They demonstrated the Aladdin and often left the lamp in the home for an overnight trial. The agent arranged for local merchants to stock supplies. In 1928 the company turned solely to franchise dealers-some 15, 000 in the early 1930s. The company advertised extensively in newspapers and through radio.

Smilin Ed McConnell was so popular that he became the "Aladdin lamp man. " In 1949 the company moved their central office from Chicago to Nashville, Tennessee, the home of Aladdin Industries' today. Aladdin lamps were made in the USA until 1963, after which brass lamps were imported from England. Only the glass lamps continued to be made in the USA. Since 1977 the Aladdin burners have been manufactured in Hong Kong while the fonts are made in the USA and England. Chimneys, wicks and mantles are made in other countries today.

In 1999 Aladdin Industries sold the lamp division to collector/investors who named their company Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company, located in Clarksville, Tennessee.

Watson hardware store, Golconda, Illinois, 1937. Very Brief History Colorful Short Lincoln Drape Aladdin lamps are available from the Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company today. "Wireless" World's Finest Non-Electric Lamp Indeed! The Aladdin lamp was developed through application of scientific principles:

Ami Argand, 1750-1803, invented the principle of center draft whereby air is provided inside a tubular wick to the flame of a lamp. Argand's "air lamps" became known as "Argand lamps, " which he first patented in England in 1784.

Dr. Auer von Welsbach, 1858-1929, an Austrian chemist, invented the incandescent gas mantle in 1885, a huge improvement in the history of artificial lighting. The early technology of adapting the mantle to oil lamps was developed in Germany.

Beginning in the early 1900s companies in the United States recognized the tremendous advantage of these improved lights. The Aladdin lamp became the world-wide leader in non-pressure incandescent lamps during the next 50 years.