Tiffany #1469

18,950

Here is a very rare and beautiful TIFFANY lamp. . Correct in all ways. The glass is really outstanding. I have tried to show how the color graduates from a little darker at the top and changes toward the bottom. Just spectacular. Digital pictures never show the true beauty but these are not too bad. Shade is 18" properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK # 1469. Free of any damage or repairs, has one tight heat line. Has the shade rattle. Patina is as good as it gets, as with the base.

The base is also very good. Stands 24", all hardware is correct and is original with working GECO sockets. Is properly signed and numbered #358. Properly rewired for another century of dependable service. Both numbers check out properly in the Tiffany book.

Would be a wonderful addition to any advanced collection. A true piece of historic American art/lamp history. Will sell low at $18, 950.

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS
JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art
glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking
technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant,
multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the
traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects.
Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement,
challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing
designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in
Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and
nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique
approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most
important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art
Nouveau.
In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany
began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own
home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and
inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps
represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of
the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and
1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for
sale.
Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and
windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork,
furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in
1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing
lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom,
company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do
with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable
career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany &
Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces
and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.
By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the
popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and
Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were
forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that
his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys
craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern
Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around
the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND
MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY


Tiffany Table Lamp #358

28,500

Here for your consideration is a very nice and rare TIFFANY table lamp. Excellent glass and workmanship. Properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK #1469. Has the shade rattle.
The base is the 25" footed signed and numbered #358 and rewired for another century of dependable service. $28, 500. 00.

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS
JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art
glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking
technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant,
multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the
traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects.
Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement,
challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing
designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in
Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and
nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique
approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most
important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art
Nouveau.
In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany
began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own
home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and
inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps
represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of
the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and
1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for
sale.
Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and
windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork,
furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in
1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing
lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom,
company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do
with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable
career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany &
Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces
and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.
By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the
popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and
Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were
forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that
his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys
craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern
Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around
the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND
MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF
MONEY


Handel Harbor

8,950

Here for your consideration is a wonderful HANDEL harbor scene 18" recerse painted lamp. The shade is 18" reverse painted in the harbor scene signed Handel #5936 WR, whom is William Runge, one of Handels finest artists. Super artistry and great detail. The shade ring is also properly signed. All in excellent original condition. Free of any chips, cracks or repairs of any sort.

The Handel base is also properly signed and stands 23" high and is the base shown in the Handel books with the harbor lamps. A real bargain at $8950. 00.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Bonzi

8,750

Here for your consideration is the very rare HANDEL BONZI. Shade is 18", reverse painted in amassing detail and coloration and signed by Albert. Parlow is touted as Handel's premiere artist. Is also numbered #6440 The base is known as the woodland or the Swampy, measuring a whopping 23" highAll hardware is original, great patina and works well. A real bargain at $8750. 00.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Bigelow And Kinnard Table Lamp

8,850

Here for your consideration is a really outstanding and rare BIGELOW and KINNARD table lamp, the best ever. The Bigelow Co. were of such high quality in workmanship and selection of high grade glass, one of the few lamp manufactures that raveled TIFFANY. The shade measures 18" is properly signed BIGELOW & KINNARD BOSTON. Glass has the graduated colors that blend perfectly. Has the internal price tag loop, and free of damage save one tight heat line. I have attempted to capture the beauty with my digital camera.
The solid bronze lamp base stands 23. 5" high and has all it's original high grade hardware including 3 two screw EDISON sockets and acorn chain pulls. Rewired for another century of dependable service.
An important piece of American art/lamp history, that will bring rare beauty every day and a super investment. Price low to sell from my personal long time collection. $8850 marked down aggressively to enhance the sale

Examples of Bigelow and Kinnard lamps can be seen in this link

Bigelow & Kennard Boston. Leaded Lamp shades and Chandeliers

THE BIGELOW AND KENNARD &Lamp;CO BOSTON, MASS. 1863-1922. HOMER
L. BIGELOW, THE HEAD AND GUIDING SPIRIT OF THE STUDIOS SINCE ITS INCEPTION
. IN THE EARLY YEARS THE CO. MANUFACTURED AND SOLD A WIDE ARRAY OF SILVERWARE
PRODUCTS. IN 1900, THEY STARTED TO MAKE HIGH QUALITY LAMPS. AROUND 1908,
CONSUMER SPENDING SLOWED WITH LAMP MAKING STOPPED IN 1910. THE ONLY KNOW
DOCUMENTATION IS THE 1909 NEW ENGLAND MAGAZINE ARTICLE. MANY OF THE FINE LAMPS
ARE IN EXISTENCE AND FETCH HIGH MONEY


Tiffany 20 IN Conical Lamp

19,750

Greetings to all. This is Don Shay offering a wonderful and large TIFFANY table lamp. The 20" shade is properly signed and in excellent original condition with really superior mottled green glass and superb workmanship as we have come to expect from the great Tiffany Lamp Company. The stick base stands a whopping 26" high, is signed and numbered as shown. All hardware is correct and rewired for safety.
Special low price $19, 750.

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant, multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects. Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement, challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art Nouveau.

In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and 1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for sale.

Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork, furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in 1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom, company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany & Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.

By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY


Handel Table Lamp

6,850

Here offered by Don Shay is a very nice HANDEL 18" x 24" table lamp. Fully signed and numbered 6638 and artist signed by RUNGE. One of HANDEL'S artists, highly listed in his own right. This lamp is in excellent original condition in all ways, free of any chips or cracks or anything at all. The finish is chipped ice. Notice the arts and crafts vertical trees, full moon reflecting on the water Excellently executed with superb artistry. The base is pottery, properly signed with all the original Handel hardware.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand


Handel Five Shade

37,850

EXCEPTIONAL, MUSEUM QUALITY, ARGUABLY the most rare and finest example ever executed by the great HANDEL LAMP CO one would hope to find. Here for consideration is perhaps the most rare of all the HANDEL lamps. Known as the five HANDEL #6885 five shade birds in flight scenic. The 10" ball obverse painted shades are signed HANDEL and artist "PALME' OR "BIDEGE".Both Handel's top artists and both listed artist's in their own right. Is of monumental size, fixture measuring 32" wide x 55" from the ceiling. The four arm spider is solid bronze and properly signed HANDEL.Each shade has the arts and crafts vertical trees and a colorful myriad in the trees and foliage.
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel 7036

15,500

Here is perhaps the most rare, and beautiful of all the HANDEL lamps which is the # 7036 exotic birds in flight with the teal background. Very rare and desirable. Measures 18" shade and 22.5" high. Is in excellent original condition in all ways and has all the original Handel hardware. Does not get any better then this. The HANDEL Lamp Co. in 1923 was so proud of the artistry, subject matter and color selection and coordination, this is the only lamp in their books that they show the artists hand written script color selection and water color rendering of the lamp This rendering was brought before Phillip Handel and his selection committee for approval. The artist labor cost for this #7036 was so intensive, very few were done. Also, after the artist applied each color, it passed thru the kiln each time. The #7036 required many more kiln trips then normal. This lamp sold for $22,000 5 years ago in the heyday but still very valuable a real value that will certainly return robustly. This is a very rare opportunity at $15,500.

Very low priced to reflect the prevailing economy. What a great investment that will bring beauty to your home every day. An important piece of American art / lighting history from the Great HANDEL LAMP CO.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel # 7026

19,750

I thought you would like this great HANDEL # 7026 shade and base are properly signed and artist PETER BROGGI, perhaps Handel's finest artist whom was a renowned artist in his own right. This is as good as it gets. This lamp has the premium dark background and many blue colors which is very desirable. For some reason my digital camera is not picking up the blue colors very well. I Am offering this museum quality HANDEL at UNDER half price $19,750 what it sold for 8 years ago at auction $41,800 plus the auction juice, tax and delivery. This lamp started life just this way.
Photos from the Handel book also included. Please let me know of your interest
Thank You in advance for your interest. Don Shay dshay5128@aol.com 309-688-8500

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel "S" Border Palm Overlay Table Lamp

5,650

Here is a very nice and all original whopping 24" Handel "S" border palm overlay. High quality glass has those deep reds and oranges depicting the sunset. All glass and panels are tight with great patina. All original with no cracks or repairs. Both the shade and 29" base are properly signed. Notice the rare base is in the stylized tree trunk design. Has three original sockets with acorn chain pulls and teepee heat cap. Low price on this beauty to sell. Has been rewired for safety.


Jefferson Lamp

950

This is a lovely Jefferson lamp. The shade is the obverse painted "cornucopia" fruit of the gods. Base is properly signed Jefferson with good old sockets with acorn pull chains. Very nice mellow lamp. 16" shade x 21.5" high.


Bradley And Hubbard Lamp

675

Here is a very nice and properly signed Bradley and Hubbard table lamp. Shade measures 15" and is bordered with grapes and leaves, in the Handel Coralene fashion. This Coralene procedure is when the subject matter, in this case, grapes are blown on the body of the shade while the glass is still moulden.


Limbert Table Lamp

10,800

Here is the best of the best museum quality Limbert, totally arts and crafts 20" x 24" exquisite and rare all original table lamp is right as rain. This is a historically powerful and important piece of period American lighting. All glass and hardware are in excellent condition. The matching planshing and patina are the best ever as one would expect of Limbert. This lamp is shown on page 135 of the grand rapids art metal book 1902-1918 and is further identified with the stamped number 507.


Shop of the Crafters Hanging Lamp

3,250

Here is a great and rare Shop of the Crafters hanging lamp. Measures 24" and hangs 43". Retains all it's magnificent cats paw glass. Beautiful striated colors in deep reds and purples. The dark fumed oak has the original patina and all it's original hardware with four sockets and acorn chain pulls. The oak chain links,ceiling canopy and shade shape are all hallmarks of the Shop of the Crafters at Cincinnati, whom has long been accorded preeminence of the arts and crafts movement, producing sophisticated and significant designs of inlaid and other fine furnishings in the mission style. Oscar Onken's Shop of the Crafters opened in 1904 and discontinued operations under that name in 1916. A real bargain.


Handel Bent Tulip Wall Sconces

2,250

Here is a pair of very rare Handel bent tulip wall sconces. 7" x 12". Shades and fixtures both properly signed. These Handel bent tulip shades are so rare only pencil drawing appears in the Hibel/Fontain Handel book page #29. Great glass and wonderful workmanship as one would expect of Handel.
$2250 for the pair.


Handel Lamp Base

525

Here for your consideration is a very nice Handel lamp base. Has all the good old Handel hardware and is in excellent condition and rewired for safety. Is properly signed and has that good old original patina with the desirable red showing through slightly. Also has the typical Handel cloth tag even thought the felt was too bad to save.


Handel Hanging Lamp

4,675

Handel 25" hanger. Nice arts and crafts design. Great hardware and patina. The shade is properly signed Handel and has beautiful high grade original glass, with one minor tight heat line in one of the smaller pieces of glass. Five original sockets with long acorn chain pulls. Hangs 45".


Handel Double Student's Lamp

2,350

Here for your consideration is a rare and beautiful Handel double students lamp with tulip shades. This is truly a rare and early lamp. The base has a thumb wheel which allows the upper apparatus to move up and down on the shaft. Stands a tall 28" in the up position and is 21" wide. Each shade is signed Handel as is the base. Insized Handel and has the cloth Handel label and has all the original hardware. The patina is original and shows some expected wear. The glass is outstanding with the heavy texture that really fires up. All glass is original, free of any cracks. Provides nice, soft no glare light that bounces off the ceiling. The base is heavily weighted for stability. This rarity has a value of $3,200 and up. Has that pleasing Handel look that draws your eyes to it. Kind of soul satisfying. Little wonder, Handel hired the best of the best talented designers on the planet to execute his work. I would low ball it for $2,350. Plus shipping and insurance.


Handel Ball Lamp

675

Handel 9" ball lamp. Properly signed Handel and numbered 2153. Beautifully painted yellow and green leaves. Nice hardware. Priced to sell quickly.


Arts & Crafts Handel Base

1,275

Here for your consideration is one of Handel's most massive bases. Described in the Handel book "bronzed metal base of Boluster form, molded with stylized petals ascending the body, raised on circular spreading foot with scalloped border. The upper section molded as a stylized tree trunk. Measures 7" x a whopping 27" high. Is complete with 4 Hubbell sockets for good light distribution and 4 acorn chain pulls. Very nice patina with the desirable tones of red showing through. Will fit even the largest of the Handel shades. Rewired for safety.


Art Nouveau Statue Lamp

775

Art nouveau statue lamp executed and signed by Julian Cadet Causse (French 1914) whose works bring from $1500 to $19,500, and is a highly listed artist. This properly signed piece is 21"x 6" and is made of spelter. Is very finely detailed, beautiful young nude girl rising up out of long flowing leaves. Has a miniature socket, light and acorn pull. Really a dazzling and important piece. Priced to sell $775.


Handel Greek Key Art & Crafts Lamp Base

825

Here for your consideration is a rare and beautiful Handel lamp base known as the Greek key. This lamp is properly signed twice, with the Handel stamp and the typical cloth Handel tag and has all its original hardware with 3 Hubbell sockets and acorn chain pulls. The patina is the dark brown with the reds showing through and a slight verdi gris. Measures 6" x 21".


Pittsburgh Emerald Green Lamp

1,550

Antique Pittsburgh success emeralite doctors oil lamp. Measures 27" tall. Stunning condition with no damage or repairs. Has been electrified. The deep emerald green is magnificent with hand painted floral design and accented in gold. A real conversation piece in any room and is properly signed.

A practical and rare piece of American period lighting. Almost none have survived these past 90 years. This is a rare and collectible lamp. Notice the graceful clean lines. A practical and beautiful and great investment. The Pittsburgh "Pilabrasgo" Co. was started by Nicholas Kopp in 1900, a chemist known for his knowledge and ability to hand mold and color beautiful lamps that were very popular until 1926, when the company bankrupted. Now the upper end Pittsburgh lamps are popular and command high prices.


Handel Harp

50

Here for your consideration is a harp to fit those boudoir lamps like Handel, Moe Bridges and Pittsburgh etc. The harp is 7" high and will accommodate a 2 1/4" shade, usually a 6" to 8" shade. The harp is complete with shade support, heat cap and finale. All in nice dark brown patina. The shipping in the U.S. is $7.00. Please note the Handel lamp base is not included.


Handel Lamp, Tiffany, Roycroft Era

5,850

Here is a wonderful, Arts and Crafts, properly signed floor lamp. The shade is 22.5" diameter and very nicely done in high color glass as one would expect of Handel. Has several tight heat lines. The base stands 65" high and also is a real rare beauty in it's original patina. Has four Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls. A totally excellent lamp, rewired for safety and ready to go.


Williamson Hanging Lamp

2,750

Here is a beautiful Williamson 25" hanging lamp. Great glass and design to go with any decor. Very unusual hardware. Six good old paste sockets with long acorn chain pulls, the same tiffany used. Patina is the verdis green. Very heavy chain. Rewired for safety and ready to go. The R. Williamson Lamp Co. was organized a hundred years ago in Chicago.


Duffner And Kimberly Hanging Lamps

875

Here is a one of five hanging and properly signed Duffner and Kimberly lamps. Measuring 23.5" in diameter x 24 "drop". Drop is adjustable. Each lamp is made of beautiful striated glass in art nouveau style, with 3 lights. The light is bounced off the ceiling to avoid bulb glare and provide for even light distribution. If you have a large area, these five lights would be a rare find.


Handel 24" Bamboo Table Lamp

6,750

Here for your consideration is a very large and rare wonderful Handel 24" bamboo panel shade lamp with excellent and all in tact overlay. The glass is very nice striated with heavy textured inside and all original and free of cracks or chips. Base and shade both properly signed. The base is huge, one of the largest bases that Handel made. Found on page #138 of the Defalco Handel book. Described "bronzed metal base of vertically ribbed Chinese form, the foot molded to simulate a Chinese carved and pierced stand, the upper section molded as a stylized tree trunk." The patina is original and very nice. Has 3 Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls. This is a very rare and fine piece of American period lighting which is historically powerful and has dazzling beauty which is much greater then my digital camera could capture.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936.


Wilkinson Hanging Lamp

1,850

Dating to the 1920's, and is of high quality glass and workmanship and is a Wilkinson. It has a rose motif with eight leaded roses around the lamp as seen in the photos. These are in alternating red and pink colors with green leaves and stems. The lamp measures 21 1/2" in diameter and 11 1/2" in height. It has a two light socket and has been rewired. There are four tight heat lines but they do not distract from the lamp and are not visible unless you take a very hard look to find them. Priced to sell.


Mellon Lamp Shade

55

Here for your consideration is a very nice 9 segmented mellon shade with white cased glass interior. The casing is used for good light distribution.

Yellow mellon ribbed cased glass lamp shade. This piece measures 2 3/4" high and is 8 1/4" in diameter. The opening at the top is 1 7/8" inside diameter. Throws off beautiful color. The condition of this piece is excellent however there is some very minor mold roughness on the inside of the rim of the large opening. There are no chips and no cracks.


Handel Overlay Hanging Lamp

895

Here for your consideration is a wonderful Handel hanging lamp. The shade has two pieces of coordinated colored glass which are vibrant and in excellent condition and is totally gorgeous. Measures 10" diameter and hangs 27" the overlay is nicely done. All hardware is excellent with the original socket with acorn chain pull. The shade has the typical metal Handel tag. Absolutely magical when lit. Priced to sell.


Classique Table Lamp, Handel Era

1,250

Here is a very nice 16" x 23 " properly signed Classique table lamp. The Classique Lamp Co. Was in Chicago for many years and was known for their high quality lamps. The reverse scenic painting was done in the dimple "heavy applied paint" style. Notice the 6 tassels, all original. Newly rewired for safety. Top cap has been dented and straightened. Black paint on foot of lamp is worn. Overall an excellent lamp.


Pittsburgh Peacock Lamp, Handel Era

2,850

Here is a beautiful peacock lamp made by Pittsburgh. Properly signed. The shade is a large 17" x 23" high. The detail, and strong colors are great. Has that arts and crafts look. Excellent condition. Very rare and beautiful piece of vintage American lighting. Absolutely magical when lit up.


Chicago Mosaic Art Nouveau Iris Table Lamp

1,875

Here is a rare and very early documented Chicago mosaic table lamp, all original and in good working order. The entire lamp and especially the shade have great quality of glass and workmanship as one would expect of the wonderful Chicago Mosaic Co. The iris green turned leaves have a 3 dimensional appearance which is so cool. The variegated flowers really look real. Like having a fresh vase of flowers in the room every day. Measures 23" x 18.5". Truly a rare and beautiful piece of American vintage lighting. A real conversation piece in any room.


Handel Chinese Base

3,850

Here for your consideration is perhaps the most rare of the rare Handel lamp bases. This base is shown in the Handel Books with the 18" Mt. Fuji shade and others of the top flight Handel shades. Very heavy six footed with 3 Hubbell sockets and acorn chain pulls. The patina is original and excellent. Has been rewired for safety. On the body of the base are two sections with bamboo trees, one with bird in flight and one with flowers. Measures 24" high and 8.5" at the widest part. Has that really cool oriental flare and is described in the Handel book as "bronzed metal bulbous base molded with flowers, with the foot molded as a Chinese stand." A very rare and special fully signed Handel lamp base.


Bradley and Hubbard lamp

1,350

Here for your consideration is a great Bradley and Hubbard lamp. It is big. 26" high and 23" shade. Please note the shade is supported by a bronze 3-armed spider. All patina is good. The glass is original and free of chips or repairs and has nice coordinated colors. Please notice the Louis Sullivan design whom was the architect whom taught Frank Lloyd Wright. has all original hardware with acorn 2 acorn chain pulls and is properly signed. I would fire sale this beauty to you for $1350, plus shipping and insurance.

In 1875 Nat Bradley Hubbard and Walter Hubbard organized the Bradley and Hubbard manufacturing company on 21-23 Barkley St. in Meriden, Connecticut. Bradley & Hubbard were known for their good quality, wide variety of products,manufacturing chandeliers, piano lamps, brackets, banquet lamps, bordeaux lamps, table lamps, hanging lamps ink wells, card holders and lamp burners, and carried the center draft Bradley & Hubbard burner. Today their products "especialally lamps" are recognized as collectible and sought after.


Handel Hanging Lantern

9,500

Here for your consideration is a veritable feast for the eyes of the discriminating and astute collector of period American lighting, museum and investment quality. Very rare and collectible Handel Arts and Crafts hanging lantern Handel style # 5121. This lamp rarely comes for sale anywhere so, this is an opportunity that may not come again. measures 12" at the bottom and 10" at the top with the body being 23" and properly signed Handel. Comes with six feet of heavy brass chain which is signed Handel every few links along the way as is the ceiling hook. The striated glass is all original and free of chips, cracks or repairs as is the overlay. Notice the brick work overlay. This lantern style Handel lamp is shown on page #9 of the Handel overlay book by Robert Defalco. $9,500.00 plus shipping and insurance.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936.


Morgan Art Nouveau Hanging Chandelier

2,950

Fantastic Morgan Art Nouveau Reverse Painted Leaded Hanging chandelier with three satellite shades Garlands of Flowers & Intertwining Ribbon Bows! Circa 1910-1920's. Wonderful very high quality oversize leaded reverse painted hanger. Awesome cat paw granite glass that really glows! Has wonderful intricate Art Nouveau Garlands of flowers with draped ribbon bows. Exceptional fire when lit to the granite glass in this shade! The lamp glass is in excellent original condition, no chips or cracks. This is a completely original lamp that was taken down from a ceiling in an Albany, New York area home where it has hung since new just after the Turn of the Century. The hardware is original to the shade and it has three GE sockets with original pulls and a wonderful brass screws with flowers. The lamp has it's original wiring that was still in current use. The main shade is lamp is 18 inches wide and 11 inches deep, and the three smaller shades are 4 by 5 inches. The entire lamp is 32 inches long from the ceiling cap to the bottom. I have been selling lamps for 20 years and we have never sold a more fantastic hanging chandelier, it's the best!!! This is a wonderful Turn of the Century hanger with the best glass and beautiful leading! $2,950.This beauty is identified and shown on page #107 of the PAUL CRIST VOLUME II MOSAIC SHADES book.

JOHN MORGAN & SONS 1902-1913- 32 EAST NINTH ST WITH MANUFACTURING IN BROOKLYN NEW YORK.The Morgan Brothers manufactured a whole range of superb lighting products .Morgan evolved a unique style of hammered copper metalwork.


Pittsburgh Table Lamp, Deco Handel Era

1,850

Here is a great art deco Pittsburgh table lamp. Measures 23"x16" and is highly deco stylized with strong and beautifully coordinated colors. No chips or damage. In excellent condition. Interplay between the colors and glass are extremely pleasing. The Pittsburgh "Pilabrasgo" company was started by Nicholas Kopp in 1900, a chemist known for his knowledge and ability to hand mold and color beautiful lamps that were very popular until 1926, when the company bankrupted. Now the upper end Pittsburgh lamps are popular and command high prices.


Jefferson Peacock Lamp, Like Handel

2,850

Here is a very nice Jefferson table lamp. Measures 23" x 18" and is properly signed. The shade has 3 beautifully hand painted perched peacocks and is in excellent condition. Notice the prairie oriental flair to this artistry. Would fit nicely in a Frank Lloyd Wright setting. The base retains it's original patina with some slight wear also has two original sockets with acorn chain pulls.


Hand Painted Handel Hanging Lamp

2,275

Here is a rare and very nice hand painted Handel hanging lamp. Measures 10" x 9" and hangs 48" [adjustable] the artistry and detail is great and properly signed. Also please notice the 18" peacock table lamp plus the 18" Wilkinson lamp plus the 4 Steuben shades and the 8.5" pulled feather Steuben shade. All for sale.


Rare Handel Table Lamp

19,000

Here is a very rare and sought after Handel #7120. Properly signed in the shade and numbered and artist signed. Also the 3 footed base is signed with the cloth Handel tag on the bottom. This lamp appears in the Handel Defalco book on page 138. Described as "stylized birds of paradise in flight amidst berry - laden blossoming branches in tones of bright crystal blue, green, brown and yellow. All on a mottled dusty pink ground. The domical 18" shade in chipped lightly sanded finish, painted on the interior."

the patina is the heavy gesso style on the base and shade ring and finale. All in excellent condition. Has the original 3 Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls. This lamp has fetched in access of $25,000 at auction. Mine is $19,000 and is excellent original condition.

Phillip Handel established his lamp factory in 1885 on the corner of Miller and Catlin streets in Meriden, Connecticut. Handel hired the most talented artists and professionals available and made reversed painted and leaded shades. Chipped ice shades were produced and relatively unique to Handel and signed by well known artists as Bailey, Palme, and Parlow. The chipped ice was created by painting the shade with fish glue and heated to 800 degrees Fahrenheit. The contraction of the glue in the cooling process caused the textured finish. The Handel Co. Ceased operation in 1936 as their designs succumbed to the new art deco aesthetic,but few other vintage lamps are as avidly collected today.


Pittsburgh Roses Table Lamp

725

Here is a beautiful Pittsburgh roses table lamp, measures 20" x 15.5" and is in excellent original condition. Is properly signed. The outside surface has a most unusual raised configure. A nice piece of American vintage lighting by Pittsburgh. Has several red roses in full bloom with green leaves and stems.

the Pittsburgh "Pilabrasgo" Co. was started by Nicholas Kopp in 1900, a chemist known for his knowledge and ability to hand mold and color beautiful lamps that were very popular until 1926,when the company bankrupted. Now the upper end Pittsburgh lamps are popular and command high prices.


Pittsburgh Hand Painted Dafodil Lamp

1,650

Daffodils daffodils all year long. Bring flowers and joy to your home every day of the year with this beauty. Here for your consideration is a lovely 1920's Pittsburgh 18" reverse hand painted daffodil floral panel lamp. Retains the original brass dual sockets, brass pull chains, shade holder, and finial. Lamp measures 25" tall by 8" diameter. In good working order with new cord and plug. The matching shade has six reverse painted panels with band of florals beneath green background, the glass surface "chipped ice" texture. Frame measures 7-1/2" tall by 18" diameter. Very good condition: metal without breaks or losses, original finish with slight wear at shade holder and finial. Glass panels and reverse painting without any damage or wear. A practical and beautiful and great investment. The Pittsburgh "Pilabrasgo" Co. was started by Nicholas Kopp in 1900, a chemist known for his knowledge and ability to hand mold and color beautiful lamps that were very popular until 1926, when the company bankrupted. Now the upper end Pittsburgh lamps are popular and command high demand.


Pittsburgh Table Lamp, Roses

975

Here is a very nice Pittsburgh table lamp in full blossoming roses. Like having a fresh bouquet of roses on the table every day. Measures 18.5" x 14.5" and is in excellent original condition and is properly signed Pittsburgh. No chips or cracks. Notice the Corelene style, this technique was used by Handel and other upscale lamp companies of that elegant bygone era. A practical and rare piece of American period lighting. A beautiful and great investment. The Pittsburgh " Pilabrasgo" Co. was started by Nicholas Kopp in 1900, a chemist known for his knowledge and ability to hand mold and color beautiful lamps that were very popular until 1926,when the company bankrupted. Now the upper end Pittsburgh lamps are popular and command high prices.


Tiffany Harp Lamp

5,400

Here is a very nice Tiffany harp floor lamp. The base had a rich brown patina with verdis green which is all original; socket, switch, (Geco). This has been rewired professionally. The lamp stands 55 inches tall and is signed Tiffany Studios, New York, #423 and may be referenced in the Tiffany at Auction Book, (Duncan) page 79 plate 211. Overall, the base is in near MINT condition. The shade is the rare Loetz 9" with crackle glass circa 1910. Here is a chance to own a true vintage fine piece of American period lighting by Tiffany.


Green Cased Glass Shade For Oil Lamp / Student Lamp

95

Here for your consideration is a great vintage cased glass shade only. Measures 10" diameter with a 2 5/8"opening for a chimney x 4" high. Has that dark tamoshanter green not the newer blue/green.


Wilkinson Lamp, Handel Era

3,850

Here is a beautiful and excellent Wilkinson, whopping 24" x 66" floor lamp. This shade is known a the cats eye. All hardware and patina is very nice. Rewired for safety.


Wilkinson Hanging Lamp

2,850

Here for your consideration is a big, beautiful Wilkinson hanging lamp. Measures a whopping 25" x 16" top to bottom. Comes with the good old 4 light cluster, 36" of the original very heavy brass chain and ceiling canopy plus long acorn chain pulls. This shade has superb glass with wonderful coordinated colors and textures with excellent workmanship. All of which were the hallmark of the great R.Wilkinson Lamp Co. located at Washington & Jefferson streets in Chicago, IL a century ago. Over the years several of these beauties have sold at Fontains, all around $5500 to $6500. This one is a real fine and beautiful lamp.


Handel Table Lamp

1,875

Here for your consideration is a very nice Handel table lamp. The shade is just spectacular with a wonderful romantic. Jade color. "looks somewhat blue in the pix however is jade green color" measures 23" x 16". Has all the original hardware and 3 acorn chain pulls. Rewired for safety and ready to go. Priced to low to sell. Reigning beauty.


Jefferson Peacock Lamp

1,975

Here for your consideration is a very nice and properly signed Jefferson lamp. Measures 18" x 23". The shade is just jaw dropping beautiful with peacocks, tree limbs and leaves, all stylized in the oriental theme. The shade is reverse painted and is in excellent condition as is the base. Rewired for safety with all original hardware. The Jefferson Lamp Co. was 1st established in 1900 in Steubenville, Ohio a renowned area for glass making. The company Moved to Follanbee, WV. in 1907 and went bankrupt in 1933. Here is a chance to own a rare and fine piece of period American lighting that is beautiful and historically powerful. Priced low to sell.


Handel Hanging Bird Lamp

1,275

Here for your consideration is a very rare Handel hanging lamp with a deco flair. A single one of these rare shades was listed in the Fontains auction of April 29, 2000 with a selling estimate of $2000 to $3000. 10" Handel ball enameled on the exterior with an exotic bird perched on a tree branch. This rare and beautiful deco shade and fixture are properly signed Handel. Hard to find words for this awesome lamp. Measures 10"and hangs 44" on heavy brass Handel chain and has been rewired for safety. Shown with a 25 watt bulb, so would show better with 40's. The large tassel is hollow brass as Handel made them. A fine investment grade piece of important American lighting. Sold as shown with the deco arched hanger or traditional ceiling canopy. Priced low to sell.

History of the great American Handel CO.
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936.


Chicago Mosaic Flower Table Lamp

2,950

Here for your consideration is a rare Oversized Huge Chicago Mosaic Leaded Glass Table Lamp. Chicago Mosaic Tulip, Daffodil Leaded Glass Table Lamp WITH Arts and Crafts BRICK WORK GLASS Circa 1915. Wonderful very high quality oversized huge leaded table lamp on it's original base. This lamp was made just after the Turn of the Century by The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic. Awesome granite glass that really glows! Has a wonderful Art Nouveau Floral Tulip and Dogwood floral design, that was very popular. Exceptional fire when lit to the granite glass in this shade! The lamp glass is in excellent original condition. It's a very big heavy lamp. The huge lamp base has a stunning fruit and flower reposse base, with a classic fluted column. Three original GE sockets have been rewired and are in working condition ready for your home or shop with period pulls. The shade has a really nice patina, with the golden leading you often see in Chicago lamps. The lamp is a huge 32 inches high, and the shade is exceptionally deep 11 inches. The lamp shade is 22 inches wide. This is a really huge leaded table lamp! Not your every day leaded lamp, this one is an exceptional beauty! Very reasonably priced. A good investment that will bring joy every day of the year.


Handel Thorny Roses Lamp

call

Signed Handel Reverse Painted Lamp Thorny Roses. Signed, numbered Handel's most coveted artist Bedigie.


Handel Flowered Lamp

19,750

Here for your consideration is a wonderful and rare Handel 18" full flowered in full bloom lamp numbered #6688. This lamp has fetched $26,000 at Fontain's auction house. This lamp is real special being signed 4 times and with the rare 3 legged base and super rare glass finale, all shown in the Handel book.

this lamp is in excellent condition with vivid colors. Nicely executed scene with butterflies amidst rose blossoms in various stages of bloom. All hardware is original with 4 Hubbell sockets and acorn chain pulls. Has been properly rewired for safety. A good investment at $19,750 that will bring joy to ones home every day of the year.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. Now the good old Handel's are very collectible and hold their investment value world wide.


Signed Handel Hanging Fixture

3,350

Here for your consideration is for a beautiful large signed "Handel" hanging fixture that is 25" in diameter and hangs 45" from the ceiling on heavy signed Handel brass chain. This early 20th century leaded shade is one of Handel's largest production shades. Has that special glass that Handel was known for a smaller version of the shade (22") is shown in the Handel Lamp Book by Hibel and Fontaine on page 61 in the lower left image. The shade is eight (8) sided with bent glass at the transition to the border, is 9.5" deep. The borders have an overlayed stylized floral pattern with painted leaves and floral features. The fixture is in an inverted configuration with 5 Hubbell sockets with long acorn chain pulls. Notice the original Handel "squashed ball" cluster. The fixture is in very good completely functional condition with some minor glass cracks consistent with a fixture of this age. All cracks are tight and stable. Comes complete with all hardware ready to hand and rewired for safety .This fixture was made during the same period as Tiffany Studios, Duffner and Kimberly, Unique, Wilkinsons and other higher end leaded lamp makers. A real bargain at $3,350.

This fixture hung in the now demolished "Blackie's House of Beef" that was a local Washington, DC landmark for many years.

I will double box and ship the fixture by UPS or FedEx Ground with the actual shipping paid for by the buyer. Insurance will be required. The fixture weighs approximately 40 pounds.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Suess Floor Lamp

28,500

Here is a truly an outstanding and rare Suess floor lamp. A chance of a lifetime. The shade measures 24.5" and has truly the highest quality glass and workmanship. The textured glass really fires up when lit. The colors intertwine in perfect harmony. Has a few tight heat lines. Please see the pictures from the Suess book shown as #407. The base is solid brass and very heavy to support the huge shade. The six Bryant socket cluster is also a picturesque piece of art. Stands 67" high. This monumental Suess lamp is a rare and important piece of vintage American lighting. The Suess Ornamental Glass Co. was located in Chicago, IL and was a high end competitor of Tiffany.


Handel #7106 With Rookwood Base

9,500

Here for your consideration is the best of the best Handel lamps. A veritable feast for the eyes of the discriminating and astute collector of period American lighting. The Handel shade is 18" domical molded with the 8 vertical lobes and sand finish. The shade is meticulously decorated. Phillip Handel held this patent personally. It is properly signed Handel with the number 7106 and artist initialed "William Runge" of whom was said, was Handel's finest designer/painter. This was said by Julius Lewis, a genius who was credited for Handel's huge success after Philip Handel died in 1914 of a gun shot wound. The design, artistry, detail and bright well coordinated colors are all excellent, made in 1924, and three dimensional appearance. Described in the Handel book "The Scene of Vertical" Arts and Crafts trees in bloom, hills, sky and stylized pink roses in bloom. Matching Rookwood base in the matt finish has the Rookwood signature and #2606. Measures 7" at the foot and is 23" total height. Has flowers and vertical lobes as well. Was made as a lamp base by Rookwood for Handel and this spectacular Handel shade. All hardware is 100% Handel. Very rare. This lamp has that fungsway. The ancient art of Fengshui or Fungsway broadly translated as: "the environment matters" or "the feel of a place, soul satisfying", is still relatively new to the West.


Kramer Hanging Lamp

875

It's a beautiful all original hanging leaded glass lamp with great art nouveau design. This lamp has much more height than similar lamps of the period with 15" deep sides. It measures 24" across at the bottom of the shade. The colors are strong and well coordinated. Has nice art nouveau design with clean and pleasing lines. Comes complete with all the hardware, cluster, sockets with acorn chain pulls, chain and ceiling canopy and newly rewired for safety. This beautiful is identified as made by the Kramer Bros.& Co.213 Grand Street New York, made in 1 on page 326 of the Paul Crist Mosaic II book. Priced low for quick sale.


Massive "Uniquie" Table Lamp

3,850

I am offering my massive table lamp manufactured by the "Unique Art Glass Metal Co." This beautiful lamp measures a whopping 22" shade x 31" high. Retains its original patina and hardware. Has 4 Perkins sockets with long acorn chain pulls. This lamp is shown on page 42 of the Paul Crist mosaic book. This lamp has it all. Notice the natural organic vines which flow top toward the bottom ringed with colorful flowers in full bloom and green foliage. The colors are strong and well coordinated with great workmanship as one would expect of the Unique Company. Has been rewired for safety. The Unique Company was started in 1889 by George W. Bailey and held many patents and was located at 46 Park Place New York. They had hundreds of artists and employees in two plants in New York. The 3 years from 1905 and 1907 were the high water mark for the company. A period of economic optimism when the public's appetite for expensive lighting was at its peak. The company executed very elaborate shades with the mean sales price of $35. In 1917 the waning depression years, the company went out of business. Here is a chance to own an important piece of American art history. A real bargain price.


Handel Rookwood Table Lamp

8,650

Here for your consideration is a lovely and rare Handel lamp with an 18" chipped ice shade. Reverse painted with flowers in full bloom and vertical trees, great artistry and sharp detail. Properly signed twice and numbered # 7106 the colors match the Rookwood base. The Rookwood base measures 23" high and is properly signed Rookwood, numbered # s2168 and artist signed "Margaret Helen McDonald," who was a very well trained and highly thought artist in her own right who worked with Rookwood from 1913 to 1948. The hardware is Handel and signed with 3 Bryant sockets and acorn chain pulls. The well coordinated colors are soft and harmonious. The Handel shade and Rookwood base are in excellent condition and works well. An important piece of American art.


Rare Wilkinson Table Lamp

5,975

Here for your consideration is a really outstanding, beautiful and rare Wilkinson table lamp. Stands a whopping 29" high with a 20" shade. The base is known as the 3 foot king Louis and is found on page #244 and 257 of the Paul Crist mosaic book. Has all the correct hardware and in excellent condition with original patina. The 20" waterlilly, in full bloom. Shade is found on page #249 of the same book." This documentation will be supplied with the lamp. The glass is granite backed and textured of pop. The colors are well coordinated and strong. Please notice the wigley glass which is most difficult to manufacture. This fine American made piece of art is likely worth $10,000 or beyond. I am selling for a low $5,975. Elmer E.Wilkinson was born in Canada in 1860. The Wilkinson Co. was incorporated in 1907, 1715 8th Ave Brooklyn, NY. Wilkinson trained as a clockmaker, and specialized in elaborate clock cases with Seth Thomas movements. Wilkinson's experience in design and manufacturing fancy metal works of art formed the foundation for his venture into art glass lighting. Wilkinson's factory was outfitted with a complete foundry, plating and finishing departments. Their metal work is exemplary in handsome design and finely detailed castings; there was none better in the industry. Wilkinson was able to bring a new standard of excellence to the medium based on his confident designs and solid engineering. Their lamps sold for more then the mainstream company's. Wilkinson steadfastly refused to compromise on his quality, even as the demand for superior lamps declined, which led to the demise of the company. After only 6 years in business. Today, Wilkinson lamps are in demand and fetch high prices.


Handel Special Base

3,000

As many of you know, I specialize in really special lamps, especially Handel. Here is one of those most rare Handel lamp bases. Every now and then a really special piece comes along, this is it. Described in the Handel books "silvered metal base in the form of a Japanese vase molded with birds and prunus blossoms in low relief, the foot molded to simulate a Chinese carved and pierced hardwood stand." This beauty stands 24" high x 7" wide at the foot. Very few Handel lamp bases were produced and only under special order. This is an all original, museum quality lamp base for the advanced collector. Has been completely rewired for safety, ready to go for another century of service. Even all the hardware are in silver with 3 Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls, heat cap, cluster ball riser, all of it in silver and is properly signed Handel.


Handel Basketweave

7,950

Here for your consideration is a very rare Handel Basket weave table lamp. The 20" shade is the golden amber with cobolt border. Throws off that beautiful coppery aromatic light. All the basket weave overly is excellent. The base is 26" high and has the matching rare basket weave as well. All original, both shade and base are properly signed and has all correct hardware and patina. This investment grade lamp has it all. A museum quality Handel lamp.


Pittsburgh Lamp

2,250

Here is a very beautiful 1920's reverse painted Pittsburgh lamp. This is the very rare molded kiln slump and hand painted process Full of bright well coordinated colors with excellent artistry.This lamp is properly and has been identified in the L-W Better Electric Lamps of the 20's and 30's book page 75 (see picture). The lamp is approximately 20 1/2" tall x 8" diameter base. The shade is 16 1/2" extreme diameter x approximately 6 1/4" deep and the top fitter hole is 3 1/8" in diameter. The shade has beautiful climbing roses painted on the inside and the exterior is a rough sandy type texture and is in excellent condition with no chips cracks, repairs or paint loss. The base is in very nice original condition with minor paint losses but still looks beautiful. Also, it has been newly rewired with the correct dated brown cloth type wire and it all works very well.


Handel 3619 Poppy Lamp

5,550

Here for your consideration is a very nice and very rare Handel Poppy lamp. The execution of coordinated colors and true artistry are outstanding. The shade has the typical signed HANDEL ring with patent number and Signed inside the rim of the shade HANDEL 3618 P. This number indicated the lamp is early "1910". The Artist is ALBERT M. PARLOW whom was one of Handel's premier artists and a listed artist in his own right. The very talented Parlow was Handel's chief designer and in charge of very important decorating department. The lamp measures 25" x 16". The base is also one of Handel's most sought after with original patina and all original and correct hardware and also properly signed HANDEL. This Handel lamp is museum quality and free of any nicks, cracks or damage of any sort.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Egyptian

14,500

Here for your consideration is one of the most rare and collectible of all the Handel leaded lamps: The Egyptian. Glass and workmanship are superb as one would expect of this grade of Handel. Also all hardware and patina are great with 20.5" shade and base properly signed. This investment grade Handel is truly a good investment as I am offering to you for $14,500.


Floral Table Lamp

1,300

Here for your consideration is a very nice floral table lamp by THE ROYAL ART GLASS CO OF NEW YORK 1910 1925, as found and identified on page #319 of the PAUL CRIST MOSAIC SHADES VOLUME II book. As with any century old leaded lamp this lamp has several heat lines. This lamp retains it's original patina and hardware.


Classique Lamp

1,995

Here is a very nice CLASSIQUE lamp. Measures 18" at the reverse painted scenic shade and 22" high. Both the base and shade are properly signed. The shade is signed CLASSIQUE and numbered # 8217 and artist signed "CHAMPAIGN" is in excellent condition and works well. The color and details of the scenic view are spectacular and heavy chipped ice on the obverse.

Classique Lamp Co. was in Chicago for many years and was known for their high quality lamps. The reverse scenic painting was done in the dimple "heavy applied paint" style.


Handel Segmented Table Lamp

2,950

Here for your consideration is a very nice HANDEL segmented table lamp measuring 18" x 24.5". The high quality Glass color and coordination is great as is the workmanship as one would expect of the great HANDEL LAMP CO. Both shade and base are properly signed HANDEL. All hardware and patina are original and free of any cracks or chips. Has been rewired for safety and another century of service. $2950 is a very low price for this beauty.


Suess Poinsettia

8,950

Here for your consideration is the rare and beautiful Suess POINSETTIA in full bloom. This excellent lamp measures a whopping 24" at the shade and 26.5" high with a huge and stable 11" foot. The Suess Co. built their products with heavy solid bronze. All very heavy duty and used great patina. Here is an opportunity to own a historically powerful, a true piece of American period lighting. Has four Hubbell's with acorn chain pulls for good lite distribution. The variegated glass is really special high quality with great and strong colors and the superb workmanship ever. Throws off magical lite. Has a few tight heat lines as one would expect with a century old lamp. Has been rewired for safety and ready for another century of service. This lamp, shade and base is displayed on page #13 of the SUESS LAMP BOOK. $8,950. The high end Suess lamps of this caliber have brought $15,000 to $20,000 in good economic times.

MAX SUESS
Suess Ornamental Glass and Lamp Co.750 -760 Troop Street Chicago, IL.
Circa 1895 - 1908. The Suess Co. was created in Chicago by a group of talented artists that desired to make superior lamps to rival Tiffany. Some of the artists and workman left Tiffany Co. for Suess. They used the finest glass and workmanship and designs. Here is a quote from the Suess book "we have spared no pains whatsoever in the design, material or workmanship of our lamps to give full value. At much expense we have sought to produce original colors, and designs that you may have proper conception of their beauty. Our Suess lamps represent the highest artistic talent in design, the best material and the most skillful craftsmanship obtainable." Today the Suess lamps are rare and coveted and command high prices when they come available. May 23,1908 a box company next door caught fire and burned Suess to the ground, ending production.


Shop Of The Crafters Hanging Lamp

4,350

Greetings, I am offering my SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS hanging lamp. Truly arts and crafts and rare as hen's teeth. Main shade is 24" x 24" with 4 - 7" satellite shades and hangs 43" from the ceiling. Great glass and strong well coordinated design and vibrant colors. The lamp is properly signed on the main shade as shown. Has been rewired for another century of dependable service. Hardware is all original with square hanger chain and acorn chain pulls. $4350.A very rare and important piece of American period lighting.

THE SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS FURNITURE CO.WAS STARTED IN CINCINNATI BY OSCAR ONKEN IN 1906 UNTIL 1919.SOC.WAS KNOWN FOR THEIR HIGH QUALITY HAND MADE FURNITURE AND LIGHTING. SOC USED ONLY THE FINEST QUARTER SAWED WHITE OAK AND SUPERB WORKMANSHIP.


Pine Tree Lamp

9,750

Greetings, as most know, I from time to time offer lamps from my collection to a select few. In keeping with that tradition, here is a magnificent HANDEL "S" border pine tree lamp. Both shade and base are properly signed HANDEL, free of any damage or repairs in excellent condition. The "24" diameter shade has high quality glass is full of color accented by the SOUTH SEAS overlay.

The base is known as the bulbous, very heavy, for stability with good original patina. has that special and most desirable 5 socket cluster with 5 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls and tee pee. Measures 60" high which includes the tee pee shade support. This beautiful / functional lamp has it all. Has been rewired for another century of dependable and safe service. An important piece of American vintage lighting. In times past, this lamp has brought $18,000 at auction. Due to the present state of the economy, I am selling for $ 9,750.

Respectfully Submitted for your consideration

DON SHAY
DSHAY5128@AOL.COM

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Vintage Arts & Crafts Single Socket Sconce

165

A Vintage Arts & Crafts single socket sconce with a glass insert and cutout design around the top. Circa 1900. Unsigned. Made of brass with a painted dark patina. Very good condition with no chips, or cracks to the glass. The glass is high quality opalescent. Has a acorn chain pull socket, all in good working order. There is a tiny dent to the top of the sconce. It is wired. Measuring 11" by 9". The glass measures 6" by 3". Would go with your Arts & Crafts, Mission, Stickley decor.


Chicago Mosaic Table Lamp

1,775

Here is a very nice and rare Chicago Mosaic 20" x 25" table lamp.

Please notice the White and pink Peony flowers against a yellow and green foliage and vines background. Really high quality eye popping glass and great workmanship as one would expect from the CHICAGO MOSAIC lamp Co. Base has a nice red/brown patina. Shade does have some very minor heat lines spread throughout the shade. Base has a switch on the lower platform Has 3 good old original sockets with acorn chain pulls. Has been rewired for another nearly a century of dependable service. Great lamp and great color. 20" diameter x 25" height.

Reduced from $2250 to $1775.

Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, c. 1910s. "Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps.


Hyacinth Macaw Parrot Handel Ball Shade

3,450

Up for your consideration is a very nice signed and numbered 10" Hyacinth Macaw Parrot Handel Ball Shade with all orig. hanging hardware. This ball shade is very nice, has a very heavy chipped ice and painted texture. Decorated on the exterior with 2 parrots and wonderful floral branches. The shade is signed F.L. which was Florence Lewis that was one of the best artists in the Handel factory at the time. Shade is #6696. The hardware is all orig. with a fantastic deep brown patina and verde green thru out. The best patina I have seen. I would rank the patina right next to Tiffany's. The shade is 10" in dia. and the fixture hangs from the ceiling 32". I actually have a pair of these lamps and the matching 60" Handel floor cylinder lamp. Properly signed Handel 7097 a. The a is Albert Parlow, also one of Handel's best ever. Each of these rare and beautiful lamps is $3,450.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

2,675

This is a really nice early signed Wilkinson Table Lamp. It is properly signed Wilkinson Brooklyn NY on the underside of the base. Lamp measures 22'' high and 16'' across. It was originally a gas burning table lamp but was converted to electricity for safety. The socket was replaced some time ago as shown in the picture. I however have replaced the socket with Hubbell with acorn chain pull. "not shown" It is probably one of the nicest Wilkinson bases I have ever seen. I would put it up against any other base no matter who made it. It is a very high quality bronze plated and verdigris green patinated base in original finish. The rare "bump "base has its original verdigris riser with the decorated sides that everyone knows is classic Wilkinson. You can see a close up of it in the last photo. Add grace and style to any room. The shade has the same finish and is original and in excellent condition. The overlay pattern is beautifully done and with the blood red border below the brilliant green, it is stunning lit in the evening. The whole lamp is just quality through and through and the piece is extremely heavy. Hard to find a good signed example like this in this condition. An excellent addition to any collection or to use in your parlor.

Elmer Wilkinson born in Canada in 1860 started his lamp business in 1909 at 45 York St. Brooklyn, NY. With factory on 8th Ave. Wilkinson was able to bring a new level of high quality and workmanship to the lamp industry while boasting a full compliment of excellent lamps. The company enjoyed several years of high output and sales. The downturn in national economy forced the company into bankruptcy in 1915.


Pairpoint Flowered

675

Here is a very nice Pairpoint lamp. Measures 10" and is 17" high. The base is properly signed Pairpoint and numbered and has flowers in bloom on the shaft. Has good original hardware. The 10" shade also has flowers in full bloom and parrots and vertical trees to give that arts and crafts look. Has good color coordination and nice artistry definition. A very nice and showy lamp. Shade is not signed.

The Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford, MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor, Mt. Washington Glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories including the well known Pairpoint lamps.

The Pairpoint Merger

From circa 1895 to 1930, the newly formed company was best known for their blown glass shades in three types: blown out reversed painted shades, ribbed reverse painted scenic shades, and landscape shades. Cut glass lamps and lamps with metal overlay were also produced by Pairpoint during this period.


Handel Teroma

1,250

Every once in a while, something special comes along, this is one of those times. Here is a HANDEL TEROMA lamp base with the ORCHID decoration. Also has a ORCHID bud and other nice foliage. This beautiful piece is shown on page #17 of the Hibel Fontaine HANDEL book. Measures 22.5" high x 6" at the brass foot. The orchid is very nicely executed great and strong colors and very fine artistry. The Teroma base is properly signed "DECORATED BY PJ HANDEL MERIDEN CT. USA. Also is number #223/1000. Has the HANDEL hardware, also signed shade rest with HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls. The brass foot is also signed HANDEL. Has been rewired.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Heintz Lamp with Mica Shade

675

Here is a very nice Heintz lamp with mica shade. All in very good condition, rewired and ready to go. Measures 8" at the foot and 25" high with a 17" mica shade. Has a very early HUBBELL socket with acorn chain pull. The silver over bronze section of the lamp is 12" and is signed with number #8627B STERLING ON BRONZE PATENT AUG.27 1912. the patina is wonderful. This lamp throws off that romantic coppery lite.

THE HEINTZ ART METAL SHOP WAS ESTABLISHED BY OTTO L. HEINTZ IN BUFFALO,NEW YORK. IN JUNE 1911 OTTO PERFECTED HIS INVENTION OF A METHOD OF APPLYING STERLING SILVER OVERLAYS WITHOUT USING SOLDER.THE COMPANY SUFFERED A ONE - TWO PUNCH WITH THE SUDDEN DEATH OF OTTO AT 41 YEARS OLD AND THE DEFECTION OF HIS MANAGER FRED SMITH.THE GREAT DEPRESSION FINALLY CLAIMED THE CO. FEBRUARY 11, 1930.


Moe Bridges Boudoir Lamp

379

Here for your consideration is a nice Moe Bridges boudoir lamp The 8" shade has colorful flowers in good detail and matches the 15" base. Lamp is properly signed and works well.

THE MOE-BRIDGES LAMP COMPANY WAS STARTED IN THE EARLY 1900"S BY HENRIK MOE AND C.A. BRIDGES AND LOCATED IN MILWAUKEE WITH SALES OFFICES IN 9 MAJOR CITIES.. AT THAT TIME WAS THE LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF HIGH GRADE LIGHTING IN THE COUNTRY WITH OVER 200,000 SQ. FT. FLOOR SPACE. ON MARCH 23, 1923 GEORGE LUDWIG WITH THE COMPANY TOOK OUT A PATENT.MOE-BRIDGES SPECIALIZED IN BEAUTIFUL AND POPULAR REVERSE PAINTED LAMPS WITH EMPHASES ON HIGH QUALITY. Designs on Moe-Bridges lamps often feature landscapes with forest or country scenes that typically include a water element. PERFECTION WAS PARAMOUNT AND NO SIGNATURE OF GUARANTEE TAG WAS APPLIED UNTIL EACH WORK OF ART PASSED A RIGOROUS FINAL INSPECTION. IN 1934 THE COMPANY WAS PURCHASED BY THE ELECTRIC SPRAYIT CO.TODAY THE MOE-BRIDGES ARE HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND FETCH UP TO $10,000 AT AUCTION.


Handel Indian Maiden

950

Here is a very nice Handel lamp base measuring 26"x8" at the foot. Is properly signed and identified in the Handel books as a up scale premium base. has 3 Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls, has been rewired for another century of dependable service. All pieces and parts come in the deal including heat cap and finale. The share is new and totally appropriate and just plain beautiful. All the American Indian things are HOT and in high demand. Please notice the beautiful Indian Maiden, boat, birch trees etc.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Bed Lamp with Mica Shade

75

Here is a very nice brass bed lamp with mica shade. Signed 1908 -14 The Greist Mgf.Co. New Haven Ct.USA JUNIORLITE

Has 5" shade, throws off that coppery romantic lite, good for nite lite or reading. Spring loaded bracket is very versatile, will fit any bed head board, or cabinet or door.


Czech Lamp

550

This beautiful CZECH lamp is in great condition.

The base has a nice patina and shows an interesting relief pattern giving the impression of an ornate basket.

There are handles at each end and weave design around the bottom which sits on 4 small feet.

In the middle of the base on one side there are some indentations.

The shade is made from czech glass beads which are attached to a metal wire frame that fits into the top of the lamp. Colors are well coordinated.

All the beads are in very good condition.

The shade can be removed to access the bulb which is a small fitting.

The cord and plug are original.

It measures 13 inches across and 7 inches at its widest points.

It weighs 7 lb. unpacked.


Handel Hand Painted Lamp Shade

475

Fine Signed Handel Hand Painted Lamp Shade, Irises, 10" Diameter

Fine white glass (think Gone-With-the-Wind) globe shaped lamp shade signed "Handel #105". This is a hand painted lamp shade, colorfully depicting Irises of several different varieties. This is a very well painted decoration as befits one of the premiere companies of the turn of the century.

Origin is Meriden, Connecticut c1880-1900. Size is 10" diameter, 9 1/2" high. Fits a standard kerosene burner ring. Condition is excellent with very minor chipping/roughness at the base collar with no other flaws! Original unrestored paint surface.


Pairpoint Lamp

675

This lamp is 14.5" tall and 5.5" at the base. The shade is 7" wide at the bottom and 5" tall. The pierced brass shade swivels at the top of the base to direct the lite, perfect for the desk . It has a Hubbell socket with acorn pull. I have rewired it with period style cloth cord and bakelite plug. The shade has the mica insert which throws off that coppery warm lite.The lamp is in great condition, solid brass with a polished finish, as it would have originally.

You can see the lamp on page 155 of Malakoff's book, Pairpoint Lamps. The book awards it a rarity rating of #1, making it extremely rare. The shade is (numbered 3047 1/2) .


Siegress Lamp

1,275

Here is A very nice Siegrest lamp.23" x 11" with 6" aperture. Please notice the brickwork glass with the great color.

SECHRIST ALBERT LAMP CO. DENVER , 1713 LOGAN , SALES ROOMS 1033 16TH JACOBSEN BLVD. DOCUMENTATION FROM DENVER ADVERTISEMENTS SHOW THE CO. WAS IN BUSINESS 1908 , 1917 AND 1931 .produced high quality lamps. Lamp is documented in the Albert revi lamp book .


Handel Leaded & Overlay Floor Lamp

5,850

!!!!!!!!!BLOW OUT PRICE !!!!!!!!!

HANDEL LEADED & OVERLAY FLOOR LAMP. SHADE IS SIGNED WITH HANDEL METAL TAG AND TWO STARS. ORIGINAL PATINA TO SHADE AND BASE. BASE IS SIGNED, HAS FIVE HUBBELLSOCKETS WITH ACORN PULLS. LAMPS IS 65" HIGH AND WHOPPING BIG 26" DIAMETER SHADE . THE SHADE HAS VERY WELL COORDINATED COLORS and has the ginco leaf border. . NO DAMAGE TO THE SHADE OR BASE. THIS IS AN IMPORTENT PIECE OF AMERICAN ART HISTORY.VERY LOW PRICE.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday , they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand .


Handel Parrot Hanger

4,550

Here is a very nice and rare HANDEL PARROT ball lamp . This is as good as it gets. All original , properly signed HANDEL and numbered #6696 and artist signed AG. described in the handel book " RARE HANGING BIRD GLOBE. DECORATED COMPLETELY ON THE OUTSIDE.BIRD IS COBALT BLUE AND NESTLED INTO FLORAL AND FOILAGE BACKGROUND OF GREEN RUST AND PINK".Also this lamp has the super rare coralene application . All hardware is original and complete . A rare piece of American lighting art history

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday , they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand .


Pairpoint Flowered and Dolphin Lamp

1,550

Here is a beautiful PAIRPOINT flowered and dolphin lamp. Measures 24" high with a 15" shade in full beautiful and detailed , hand painted flowers. The base has wonderful patina with 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls . rewired and ready to go. Shade and base both properly signed. Just beautiful , a real conversation piece in any room and a great value at $1550.

The Pairpoint manufacturing company was established in 1880 in new Bedford, MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor, Mt. Washington glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories including the well known Pairpoint lamps.

The Pairpoint merger:
From circa 1895 to 1930, the newly formed company was best known for their blown glass shades in three types: blown out reversed painted shades, ribbed reverse painted scenic shades, and landscape shades. Cut glass lamps and lamps with metal overlay were also produced by Pairpoint during this period.


Tulip Wall Lamps

195

Deco Modern Aluminum Tulip Wall Lamps Lights Sconces

Here is a very nice pair of true deco wall lamps.

Notice the gentle goose necks and flower petals. This wonderful pair of lamps surely were the end of art nouveau and the start of art deco around circa 1935. If you like nouveau / deco, these lamps are for you and low priced.


Handel Lamp Base

695

Here is a rare and properly signed twice HANDEL lamp base. Measures 7" x 21".Has the nice 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Shown in the Handel books with premium shades . Great patina and rewired for safety.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


3 Shade Hanging Handel Fixture

2,495

Here is a nice 3 shade hanging Handel fixture with 3 properly Handel 8" segmented shades. This fixture hangs 26" however the chain can be lengthened to suit. All the glass is in good condition. The pix seem to show a difference in the amber color however all the same. The Handel trademark green border is beautiful. Very rare HANDEL.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Wall Sconces

2,900

Here for your consideration is a very nice pair of HANDEL WALL SCONCES. The shade is called the segmented in the Handel book. Shade is the 9" and both properly signed HANDEL. Nice matching patina. The whole fixture measures 13". The fixtures are solid brass, hand hammered and properly signed Handel. The colors are strong and well coordinated as one would expect from the great Handel Co. The switches are HUBBELL with long acorn chain pulls. Doesn't get much better than this. No cracks, chips or repairs.


Bellova Gnome Lamp

395

This is a Bellova gnome lamp,very rare and in fine original condition. Likely dates from the 1920's. Works just fine. Has a high / low line switch so it can be a nite lite or on high. 5 in. tall and 4 1/2 dia. It has the Silver Bellova signature on the base and the shade is numbered 1885 and patent pending. Very Rare and beautiful.

Many collectors are familiar with Emeralite lamps, those brass-based desk and floor lamps, named for their bluish-green cased glass shades and often referred to as banker's lamps. Many others are familiar with Bellova lamps which were made in innumerable shapes, sizes and colors. Few collectors, however, realize that the glass shades and bases used in both Emeralite and Bellova lamps were actually produced in Czechoslovakia under order from a single American company, H.G. McFaddin & Co. It is not known where the metal bases where made; however, is it presumed that they were manufactured in the United States and married to the Czechoslovakian shades in New York at the McFaddin factory.

EARLY HISTORY OF THE COMPANY

Bellova and Emeralite lamps were the creation of Harrison D. McFaddin. It was in 1909 that the first Emeralite lamp, as we know it today, was produced. On May 11, 1909 McFaddin's patent application for "a new, original and ornamental design for lamp shades," was approved. Thus began the manufacture of Emeralite and Bellova lamps that were to continue in production for fifty years.

Essentially, the Emeralites that are today most easily identifiable, collectible and with which the name Emeralite is most readily associated, were simply brass-based or brass-plated desk lamps with green-over-white cased glass shades. These desk lamp shades are substantially flat on the sides and the back and gently slope toward the viewer in the front. However, the shades have no sharp corners; rather, the angles are all essentially rounded. Using the cased glass technique, the shades were made of white opal glass on the inside with a layer of "green" or other colored glass on the outside.

As far as we know, all Emeralite shades were produced in the glass factory of J. Schreiber & Neffen, which plant was located in the city of Rapotin, Moravia, in what is now the Czech Republic. Although S&N, as they were referred to by McFaddin, produced glassware for other customers, their contract with a representative of H.G. McFaddin & Co. allowed them to produce the green cased shades only for Emeralite lamps. In turn, McFaddin was required to purchase a minimum volume of shades each year. In fact, at the height of production, fully one half of the S&N factory was devoted to the production of glass shades for H. G. McFaddin.

FOUR PERIODS OF PRODUCTION OF THE EMERALITES

The production of Emeralite desk lamps over the years can readily be divided into four distinct periods. The first period began in 1909 and lasted until 1916 and is known as the "4378 series". These shades were perforated with two holes, one at each side. It was through these holes that the shade was attached to the armature of the base and could be swiveled and then locked into the desired position.

The second period of production, known as the "8734 Series", began in 1916 and lasted until the early 1930's. The desk lamps produced during this period are those most often found and for which the name Emeralite is most readily identified. Unlike the earlier shades, the new shades were not perforated with holes. Instead, the bottom of the shades were indented on the sides and back to fit into the channel of the newly designed and patented (August 15, 1916) armature. The armature itself had clamps which needed to be maneuvered into place in order to keep the shade snug and stable. Since the shade was merely clamped into the fixture, it could be removed for cleaning or replacement without disturbing the electric wiring that was concealed, though easily accessible.

The third period of production began in the early 1930's and lasted probably less than five years. These lamps were generally part of the No. 9 series. Although the shape of the cased shades and the production techniques remained substantially the same as the two previous models, the newer shades increased in size from the older eight and one-half inch size to ten and twelve inch versions. These larger shades also required the use of two bulbs rather than just one. In addition, these shades were now clamped onto the base only at the back, almost in a clothes-pin fashion. The shade was designed with an indentation at the back to fit snugly into the clamp. Just as with the 8734 series, the shade could be removed for cleaning or replacement without disturbing the base or wiring.

The last period of the company began in the late 1930's and continued for about twenty years. The lamps produced during this period hold little or no interest for the collector of Emeralite and Bellova lamps and consequently have little intrinsic or monetary value. These lamps were, to a large extent, fluorescent and almost all were made with metal shades. The collector, therefore, is interested almost entirely in the Emeralite and Bellova lamps produced before the war.

Bases produced during the first period were usually very simple while becoming much more decorative during the second and third periods. Earlier bases were generally brass plated over a base metal if the bases were square or rectangular, and solid brass if the bases were round. Bases made during the second and third periods were usually solid brass. Most lamps had a hidden cast iron weight in the bottom of the base. Generally, bases during the second and third periods were sold with a brass finish or a statutory bronze patina, although special finishes could be furnished to order.

Throughout the four periods, there were numerous categories of lamp styles, each category with a number of varieties. Models included lamps for desks, beds, floors, adding machines, side chairs, draftsman's tables, typewriter tables and many other uses. Lamps were also available with optional removable inkwells, pen holders and pens, clocks and calendars. The inkwells, incidentally, were produced in glass by The Sengbusch Self Cleaning Inkstand Co. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin or the GEM company. The inkwells manufactured by GEM were usually marked EMERALITE on the bottom, along with the GEM name.

It is important to note that the starting and ending dates of the four periods mentioned above are only approximate. This is because H. G. McFaddin & Co. continued to manufacture shades and bases for previous periods for many years after they introduced the new lines. Hence, in 1940 for example, one could purchase a replacement shade for the 4378, 8734 or No. 9 lamps. Some of my catalogs from the late 1930's for example, show both the 8734 and No. 9 line lamps as well as replacement shades for the 4378 lamps, which line was officially discontinued in 1916.

BELLOVA LAMPS

H.G. McFaddin & Co. introduced its Bellova line in February 1923. Unlike most of the shades produced for the Emeralite lines, which were smooth green cased glass, Bellova shades were manufactured in other colors, as well as green, or with an acid-etched texture, or painted with an air-brush or reverse painted by hand.

What many collectors of Czech glass do not realize, is that a number of the Bellova shades found today were produced in the standard Emeralite desk lamp shape and, in fact, will fit the Emeralite 8734 or No. 9 desk lamp bases. It has even been known to find the identical acid-etched, reverse-painted desk lamp shade signed Emeralite in one instance and Bellova in another, although the latter is more likely to be the case with these fancier desk lamp shades. Nevertheless, Bellova desk lamps are often found in colors other than just the green that we associate with Emeralites. These colors include russet brown, Rhodolite (marbleized and opaque), chamois and rose. Frequently, these desk lamps have a one-inch reverse painted boarder along the bottom of the shade that reflects a floral or geometric design. It is not uncommon to find these desk lamp shades on fancier bases than the usual Emeralite desk lamps. These bases were sometimes designed and painted to complement the shade.

Next to the desk lamps, the Bellova lamps that are most familiar to collectors of Czech glass are those that were made in two parts, entirely of glass and advertised by the company as Gnome lamps. These lamps usually had a glass ball-shaped or cylindrical bottom with a mushroom or "Coolie-hat" type glass top. Sometimes the top portion of the lamp was cylindrical as well, yet squatter, like the shape of very thick hockey puck.

Gnome lamps generally came in three sizes. The largest, which were about 15" tall and 14" at their widest point (the Coolie-hat shade), were referred to just as Gnome lamps in the catalogs. The middle size, about 9" tall were referred to as Miniature Gnomes, while the smallest, at about 4" high, were called Petit Gnomes. Gnome lamps are ususally obverse-painted using air-brushing, sometimes acid etched, rarely reverse-painted and very occasionally done in a cameo cut technique similar to Galle. The colors, etching patterns and designs were numerous. However, most fall into the category of either floral or "geometric Deco". Some Gnome lamps depicted children or animals playing or oriental figures which were applied using "transfers" rather than being hand painted. Still other Gnomes had glass-applied handles on either side of the bottom part of the lamp, although this is unusual.

In addition to the desk and Gnome lamps, H.G. McFaddin & Co. produced an extensive line of Bellova lamps that were made exclusively for unique Bellova metal bases referred to by collectors as boudoir and table lamps. These lamps were generally smaller in size, although some larger table lamps have been found. In addition, a limited number of chandeliers, sconces, tube, and floor lamps were produced.

The tube lamps were usually tall and round, similar in shape to the cardboard inner lining of a paper towel roll. The panel lamps were rectangular in shape, flat on all six sides and taller than they were wide. Both the tube and panel lamps were usually cameo cut, although sometimes found as acid etched. Patterns ranged from delicate pastel florals to, believe it or not, a stagecoach with horses. All tube and panel lamps came on a flat or stepped black shiny glass base, either round for the tube lamps or rectangular for the panel lamps.The number and variety of Bellova lamps appears endless. Even an experienced collector regularly uncovers Bellova styles, colors or patterns which may never have been seen before.

OTHER LINES

Glow Night Lamp

Thermolite

In addition to Emeralite and Bellova lamps, H. G. McFaddin & Co. produced a line of heat lamps, called Thermolite, to be used for medicinal purposes and a line of industrial lamps called Mefcolite. Also, at some time during McFaddin's history, they purchased a company which produced a line of miniature oil lamps called Glow Night Lamps. None of these three lines holds any particular interest for Emeralite and Bellova collectors.

SIGNATURES

Almost without exception, all Emeralite and Bellova shades were signed. Emeralite shades were either signed with a silver ink stamp, a rectangular decal about two inches wide and one-half inch high or a round decal.

Bellova shades were always signed, as well. The Bellova signature was almost always an ink stamp although a round decal is very occasionally found. The ink stamp is about the size of a dime, usually silver, although red, white and other colors were also used. The signature consisted of what appeared to be a four petaled flower in the center of two concentric circles. On the outside top edge of the circles is the word BELLOVA and on the outside bottom edge of the circles is the word CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Bellova desk lamps were usually signed on the inside front or back of the shade, near the bottom rim. However, many Bellova lamps have been signed in any number of other places. For example, if the shade is reverse-painted with a floral pattern, the signature is usually found in the middle of one of the flowers and is often hard to see. Otherwise, the signature is generally found around the top outside rim of the shade for the boudoir and table lamps and on the underside of the top and bottom halves of the Gnome lamps. Bellova tube and panel lamps are usually signed near the bottom outside rim of the top half. The bottom half of the tube and panel lamps, which as described above is generally black glass, is usually signed on the bottom with a silver ink stamp with the word ALBINOR. Albinor is the trademarked name that H.G. McFaddin & Co. used on these black glass bases for the Bellova lamps.


Wire Cage Porch Sconces

650

This 1920s pair of Arts & Crafts Wire Cage porch sconces have been restored to their original black finish. The back plate & arm are cast iron and stamped with what appears to say LL MGF CO. #20. The shade is spun and flat sheet metal with slag glass panels. The slag glass is new & in perfect condition. Both Shades have the HANDEL signature. Each sconce is 10" tall, 6" wide & extends 9 1/2" from the wall. Original porcelain sockets are rewired & they are ready to mount. Each sconce weighs 5+ lbs = nearly 11 lbs for the pair.


DECO Ceramic Lamps

175

DECO DECO DECO

Up for your consideration are 2 vintage DECO ceramic lamps in that 1940 lime green or chartreuse in color. They measure 16" tall without a shade and are in good vintage condition. One does have a very small flea bite and some crazing.

Both are wired and have complete harps, ready to go, just need shades.


Arts and Crafts Hanging Lamp

375

Here is a nice arts and crafts hanging lamp. Measures 6" x 6" x 7" high. Has nice textured glass and pops when lite up. Great for that dark hall way, entrance foyer lite etc. Hook is stamped HANDEL however I am pretty sure the entire lamp is not Handel. Has square link chain and newly rewired and is complete with ceiling canopy and hange 50" "adjustable"


Handle Pine Tree Lamp

5,975

Here for your consideration is a very nice and rare HANDEL S border pine tree lamp. Measures 24" high x 18" diameter. Both Shade and base properly signed. This great lamp is shown exactly as it is shown here with the "S" on the base and repeated on the shade. Has 3 HUBBELL sockets and long acorn chain pulls and rewired for safety. An important piece of American art lighting.

FOR THE DISCRIMINATING COLLECTOR OF ART DECO ERA DECOR OR LIGHTING, AN OUTSTANDING ADDITION TO YOUR COLLECTION.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Wilkinson Lamp

1,795

Here is an excellent original condition Wilkinson lamp. Guaranteed period 1910 to 1930. This lamp has no excuses at all. I have corrected the acorn pulls and newly rewired for another nearly a century of dependable service from this important piece of American art lighting. The lamp measures 23 inches tall and the shade measures 16 inches wide, by 7 and 1/2 inches tall. Has high quality glass and superb workmanship and is properly signed.


Handel Table Lamp

2,750

Here for your consideration is a very nice Handel table lamp. Shown here as it shows in the Handel book nearly 90 years ago. Measures 18.5" x 26" high. Has all its correct hardware, rewired and works well. Last pic shows this great lamp as it is displayed in the Handel book. Great artistry and high quality glass and wonderful well coordinated color match as one would expect of the great Handel Lamp Co. Some of the green panels have tight heat lines. Notice the coveted tee pee heat cap / shade support. An important piece of American art glass lamps.

A real bargain at $2750.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Elephant

2,850

Out of my personal collection comes an outstanding Handel leaded, slag glass or reverse painted lamp base. This is the big one, people....the best they made. In fact I have heard it called the "elephant foot" lamp base! It is unquestionably the best one around.....just look at the pictures and you will see. The finish is a super deep dark bronze with a nice greenish patina here and there. Sockets are all old and original Hubbells with their original finish and acorn pulls. Cap and finial have the same nice dark finish and are also completely original. The base is clearly stamped on the bottom with the HANDEL mark. They just don't get any better than this one. This is a really big base. It stands 24 1/2" tall to the top of the finial and the bottom is 8 3/4" in diameter. It's heavy as well, weighing in at just over 13 pounds!


Gill Slip Shade Lamp

2,650

Here is a super deco hanging lamp by the Gill Lamp Co. All pieces and parts are original and complete and free of any defects. If you like deco, this is for you.

38" from ceiling to bottom of finial

19 1/2" across widest point

8 small glass panels 3"x7" ea

8 large glass panels 5 1/2 x 8" ea


Moe Bridges Boudoir Lamp

265

HERE IS A NICE MOE BRIDGES BOUDOIR LAMP #163. GREAT FOR A DRESSER OR CHILDS ROOM OR THAT DARK CORNER.


Wilkinson Leaded Lamp

1,450

Here is a very nice Wilkinson leaded lamp, really nicely done in the art nouveau style. A big lamp at 24.5" high with a 19" shade. Design and color selection is the best with textured glass that really pops. A conversation piece in any room. Has the Bryant 2 bulb socket with acorn chain pull. 2 very slight heat lines. The base id properly signed WILKINSON CO. BROOKLYN,NY. Low price at $1450.


HANDEL A PARLOW

1,875

In keeping with the tradition of unusual Handel lamps , here is a real Handel rare treat.This painted lamp is executed my the great ALBERT M. PARLOW..Here is what the Handel book says about this great artist. "interior shades and lamps were decorated by a select group of highly skilled men and women.ALBERT M.PARLOW was among the most talented painters and his signature appears on a variety of lamps and other Handel products." This wonderful piece is properly signed A.PARLOW and has the typical HANDEL signature on the foot of the base. The shade is mica and goes nicely albeit not original to the lamp.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Hyacinth Macaw Parrot Handel Ball Shade

3,450

Hyacinth Macaw Parrot Handel Ball Shade

Up for your consideration is a very nice signed and numbered 10" Hyacinth Macaw Parrot Handel Ball Shade with all orig. hanging hardware. This ball shade is very nice, has a very heavy chipped ice and painted texture. Decorated on the exterior with 2 parrots and wonderful floral branches. The shade is signed F.L. which was Florence Lewis that was one of the best artists in the Handel factory at the time. Shade is #6696. The hardware is all orig. The best patina I have seen. I would rank the patina right next to Tiffany's. The shade is 10" in dia. In as much as this ball lamp has a bruise or heat lines which are tight and controlled, the selling has been reduced to $1650 which is 1/3rd of the going price.


Arts And Crafts Hanging Lamp

1,850

Here is a very nice and rare ,properly signed SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS ON CICINNATTI hanging arts and crafts hanging lamp.Measures 20" diameter and hangs 36" on oak chain and oak ceiling canopy . .Has all it's original old four sockets with acorn chain pulls and is 10 sectiom.Made of white oak, quarter sawed, and patenized dark brown .The high quality glass has well coordinated colors.

Shop of the Crafters at Cincinnati, whom has long been accorded preeminence of the arts and crafts movement, producing sophisticated and significant designs of inlaid and other fine furnishings in the mission style. Oscar Onken's Shop of the Crafters opened in 1904 and discontinued operations under that name in 1919.

THE SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS FURNITURE CO.WAS STARTED IN CINCINNATI BY OSCAR ONKEN IN 1906 UNTIL 1919.SOC.WAS KNOWN FOR THEIR HIGH QUALITY HAND MADE FURNITURE AND LIGHTING . SOC USED ONLY THE FINEST QUARTER SAWED WHITE OAK AND SUPERB WORKMANSHIP .


Vintage Pittsburg Desk Lamp

545

Vintage Pittsburg Desk Lamp

Item is in good condition with normal signs of wear from use and age of nearly a century. There is a very slight flea bite on the right side of the lamp can hardly be seen.

The lamp is stamped "Pittsburg."

Item measures approx. 10" tall.

THE PITTSBURGH "PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, A CHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFUL LAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THE UPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TO THE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Handel Tree Trunk Base

2,495

Here is an opportunity to buy the coveted HANDEL Tree Trunk lamp base. Stands 24" high with 8" foot. As nice as one could hope to find. Signed twice and has all it's original hardware with acorn chain pulls. Nice old dark brown patina and rewired for safety.


Handel Table Lamp

3,475

Here for your consideration is a very nice HANDEL table lamp. Measuers a hugh 24" shade x a whopping 26" high. A really large Handel, wonderful conversation piese in any room. The shade is the paneled roses leaves with vines ascending up the shade with trellis overlay. The base is the super rare elephant foot base measuring 9" wide at the bottom and a towering 25" high. All good old hardware with acorn chain pulls. A few areas where the overlay is broken as shown.The seller told me that some of the paint was professionally touched up years ago, however not noticable. These things are reflected in the low price.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Molded Lamp

2,775

As many of you have come to know,I endeavor to present for your consideration the rare ,hard to come by up scale lamps while specializing in Handel lamps.In keeping with that tradition,here is one that certainly fits in that category. THIS HANDEL LAMP HAS IT ALL .

This 1914 HANDEL lamp is obverse and reverse painted with chipped ice with trellis , blooming flowers and leaves , fully signed , numbered #6284 and artist signed by William Runge whom was an artist of renown in his own right ,long before Handel's employment .This rare lamp shade has three bronze flowered rosettes and the super rare compound molded design which was most difficult and costly to manufacture. has true artistry in the had painted plethora of blooming flowers. Like having a fresh bouquet of blooming flowers on the table every day .

Please know this HANDEL LAMP IS EXCEPTIONAL, MUSEUM GRADE, PROPERLY SIGNED and completely correct . Albeit the HANDEL LAMP CO.was in business for half a century , while producing many designs , not all appeared in their printings as is the case here. Because of the necessary resources needed to produce this lamp,the production was very short ,which attests to it's rarity . The 24" base is the stylized tree trunk style with great original patina , 3 HUBBEL sockets with acorn chain pulls.has been rewired for another near century of dependable service .Priced to sell


Duffner & Kimberly Hanging Lamp

5,500

Here for your consideration is a beautiful and rare DUFFNER ANS KIMBERLY hanging lamp. The shade measures 20" dia. ,is properly signed and has the "cats paw" heavy textured high quality glass which really performs nicely.The modeling and satiations in the glass are the best ever and well coordinated strong colors that helped elevate the DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY to the highest quality standards with suburb craftsmanship . . The original hardware is really outstanding with matching patina on all , including the 3 brass chains and Perkins sockets.

THE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY LAMP CO .STARTED IN NEW YORK , 11 WEST WEST 32ND STREET ,IN 1905 BY FRANK DUFFNER AND OLIVER KIMBERLY AND THE VERY TALENTED DESIGNER H. T. HOWARD. D&K COMPANIES PHILOSOPHY WAS TO "OFFER LIGHTING FIXTURES IN THE PUREST PERIOD STYLES FOR THE FINEST RESIDENCES "THEY CHOSE TO COMPETE DIRECTLY AGAINST TIFFANY STUDIOS .WHY IS SO LITTLE KNOWN ABOUT THIS FINE CO ? D&K EXISTED FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF TIME ,1905 BUT BY 1913 WENT BANKRUPT. THE RECESSION OF 1908 BADLY HURT SALES FOR OPULENT EXPENSIVE ITEMS. IN 1906 THE D&K WISTERIA FLOOR LAMP COST $550 WHILE THE TIFFANY STUDIOS WISTERIA SOLD FOR $480. NOTE , BY COMPARISON A NEW MODEL A FORD OF THAT YEAR COST $450 . TODAY D&K LAMPS ARE LIKE TIFFANY STUDIOS , HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND IN GREAT DEMAND WHILE COMMANDING HIGH PRICES. VERY LITTLE PRINTED INFORMATION IS KNOWN TO EXIST. THIS CEILING CANOPY HAS THE RARE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY METAL TAG AS DOES THE SHADE.


Poppy Flowered Lamp

1,975

Here is A very nice and properly signed CHICAGO MOSAIC POPPY flowered lamp. The 19" shade has great modled and striated glass , shows off very well.The base is 24" high and is complete with 3 good old original sockets with acorn chain pulls.All patina is good .Has been rewired for safety and will deliver another near century of dependable service. Low price , high value at $1975.

CHICAGO MOSAIC HISTORY

The Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, c. 1910s. "Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps, and are highly collectible.

The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic


Wilkinson Grape Lamp

5,950

Hello to all , here is a very nice and original , properly signed WILKINSON GRAPE TABLE LAMP.A KILLER , measuring a whipping 20" very colorful with excellent glass cats paw , and workmanship.The base is also as it should be .27" high , solid ,very heavy bronze and footed , the best ever.Has 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls.Patina is matching and rewired for safety .

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN 1909 AT 45 YORK ST.BROOKLYN,NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS.THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO.INTO BANKRUPTCY IN 1915 .


Wilkinson Nasturtium

6,975

Here for your consideration is one of those special and rare table lamps. The WILKINSON NASTURTIUM.

Exceptional ,museum grade & properly signed .A very rare and valuable piece of American period art history . Arguably one of the best lamps one could hope to come across. The 20" shade has a myriad of strong and well coordinated colors with superb workmanship . The base stands 27" high and is signed and numbered and is real heavy bronze.Has all the original hardware including the trademark locking shade support , 3 Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls and great old matching patina.

This lamp sold in the Fontaine's Auctoin Gallery April 2000 for $8140.00 plus auction juice.Here is the description "WILKINSON NASTURTIUM table lamp.@0" leaded glass shade with colorful Nasturtium blossoms in pink , red , green , yellow with a amber glass background upon a fabulous bronze Wilkinson base."

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN 1909 AT 45 YORK ST.BROOKLYN,NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS.THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO.INTO BANKRUPTCY IN 1915 .


Arts & Crafts Hanging Lamp

150

Here is a nice ARTS & CRAFTS hanging lamp. Measures 7" x 13" high with a nice and original 4" frosted shade as Gustav Stickley did.Has heart cutouts in the top. Heavy original hardware.


Handel Panel Lamp

6,675

Here is a super nice and rare Handel Panel overlay with blown out panels. Measures a whopping 20" shade x 24" high.The shade is decorated on the obverse with hand painted acorns leaves and fired on with overlay ed panels. The base is the rare and sought after tree trunk in good old patina and properly signed. High quality glass and workmanship

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Chicago Mosaic Table Lamp

5,350

Here for your consideration is a massive CHICAGO MOSAIC table lamp .

The flowered shade measures a whopping 24" with the open root base 30" high. The well coordinated strong colors and excellent workmanship make this a very desirable lamp .A true piece of American art history . CHICAGO MOSAIC Flowered 24" lamp sold at Fontaines Auction on January 11th 2000 for $8900 plus the auction juice lot # 118 . This beauty of mine could be yours for $5350

The Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, Measures a whopping 24" shade x . 1910s. "Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps, and are highly collectible.

The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic


John Morgan Lamp

6,875

Well here it is, this beautiful lamp has it all. A real JOHN MORGAN 20" shade and 26" high solid bronze base with 4 early HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. The likeness of this lamp is found on page 107 of the Mosaic Shades II lamp book in the JOHN MORGAN section . Great high quality glass and superb workmanship and great well coordinated colors . Really a special lamp. $7875 A super special price discounted to $6875.00

JOHN MORGAN & SONS 1902-1913-located 32 EAST NINTH ST WITH MANUFACTURING IN BROOKLYN NEW YORK.The Morgan Brothers manufactured a whole range of superb lighting products. Morgan evolved a unique style of hammered copper metalwork. Very high quality table lamps.


Handel Table Lamp

3,775

Here is perhaps one of the most rare and hard to find HANDEL TABLE LAMPS EVER. In 35 years of HANDELING, I have only seen this HANDEL lamp in the books. Found on page 36 of the Hibel/Fontaine HANDEL lamp book. Here it is in real life. Phillip J.Handel standardized his shade supports/heat caps in two sizes with only one exception. This is that rare exception as Phillip Handel ran a regimented and standardized lamp co with strict gudlines. This was done in the early years 1902-1905 Shade and base both properly signed as shown. Shade measures 18" x 26"high with early 2 screw HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls .Great high quality textured glass with superb workmanship.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to 18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000 for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design theme.


Handel Student Lamp

2,775

Here is a very nice arts and crafts HANDEL students lamp. Has great glass in the matching 7" shades with excellent workmanship and properly signed HANDEL and have the typical 2 1/" fitter. Very nice Aurora brown patina.

The base is also excellent , properly signed and measuring 24" high x 24" wide. This lamp is excellent in all ways.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to 18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000 for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design theme.


Handel Arts And Crafts Table Lamp

5,675

Have a look at this massive HANDEL ARTS AND CRAFTS table lamp. Really a conversation piece in any room. Shade measures 25" flat to flat ,has great mottled amber glass.Properly signed , throws off that coppery romantic lite.

The base is a whopping 29" high , is bronze with 4 early HUBBELL sockets. Is also signed and numbered 5340 .Note , this is a very early Handel base.The socket cluster is not removable , is an integral part of the vertical shaft , early.

A real piece of American art/lighting history.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Swans Lamp

1,975

If you like birds in flight , here is a real HANDEL beauty. Hand painted swans on one side with herons on the other of this 15" shade.Colors , artistry and detail is jaw dropping. Measures 19" high with a properly signed HANDEL solid bronze base with 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls . This may be the bargain of the year at $1975.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to 18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000 for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design theme.


Moe Bridges Boudoir Painted Lamp

250

Moe Bridges boudoir painted arts crafts lamp. This lamp stands 12" Tall and the shade is 7"wide. This beautiful lamp has no cracks of chips and works as it should.Very nice , properly signed and correct in all ways. Works nicely in a childs room for nite lite , or on a desk or piano or any place where a bit more lite is needed.

THE MOE-BRIDGES LAMP COMPANY WAS STARTED IN THE EARLY 1900"S BY HENRIK MOE AND C.A. BRIDGES AND LOCATED IN MILWAUKEE WITH SALES OFFICES IN 9 MAJOR CITIES. . AT THAT TIME WAS THE LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF HIGH GRADE LIGHTING IN THE COUNTRY WITH OVER 200,000 SQ. FT. FLOOR SPACE. ON MARCH 23, 1923 GEORGE LUDWIG WITH THE COMPANY TOOK OUT A PATENT .MOE-BRIDGES SPECIALIZED IN BEAUTIFUL AND POPULAR REVERSE PAINTED LAMPS WITH EMPHASES ON HIGH QUALITY . Designs on Moe-Bridges lamps often feature landscapes with forest or country scenes that typically include a water element. PERFECTION WAS PARAMOUNT AND NO SIGNATURE OF GUARANTEE TAG WAS APPLIED UNTIL EACH WORK OF ART PASSED A RIGOROUS FINAL INSPECTION . IN 1934 THE COMPANY WAS PURCHASED BY THE ELECTRIC SPRAYIT CO.TODAY THE MOE-BRIDGES ARE HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND FETCH UP TO $10,000 AT AUCTION.


Handel Boudoir Palm Tree Lamp

575

Here is a nice Handel boudoir lamp with tree base and palm tree tropical reverse hand painted shade. measures 15" high x 8.5" shade . The tree trunk base has the Hubbell socket with acorn chain pull and is properly signed 2 times. Marked down from $695 to $575.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Pairpoint Greek Key

4,875

Here for your consideration is a wonderful PAIRPOINT closed top GREEK KEY. The shade and base are properly signed and in excellent original condition . This lamp falls in the upper end puffy category . All hardware , spider shade support, everything all original.

Background and History

The Pairpoint manufacturing company was established in 1880 in new Bedford, MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor, Mt. Washington glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories including the well known Pairpoint lamps.

The Pairpoint merger:
From circa 1895 to 1930, the newly formed company was best known for their blown glass shades in three types: blown out reversed painted shades, ribbed reverse painted scenic shades, and landscape shades. Cut glass lamps and lamps with metal overlay were also produced by Pairpoint during this period.


Chicago Mosaic

975

Here for your consideration is a colorful segmented 19" Chicago Mosaic shade with 23" base. The flowered glass is full of color with a pleasant graceful arched shape which is pleasing to the eye. The shade has a few heat lines as one would expect.All hardware , sockets , acorn pulls , patina are all good. $975

CHICAGO MOSAIC HISTORY

The Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, c. 1910s. "Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps, and are highly collectible.

The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic


Lamb Bros Lamp

875

Here is a rare and genuine, properly signed Lamb bros lamp. Measures 22 " high x 16" and has super well coordinated colors, high quality, striated, textured glass, all in excellent original condition. The shade also has the metal loop which was used to attach the price and information tag.
Please notice the stylized Greek Key in the base.patina is good and matching with 2 Arrow sockets with saturn acorn pulls, rewired and ready to go.
LAMB BROS & GREENE OF NAPPANEE, INDIANA MADE HIGH QUALITY LAMPS DURING THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY INTO THE 1930'S.


Lamb Bros Spider

2,750

Here is a very nice and properly signed Lamb Bros Greene lamp. Known as the spider shade. Has great high quality glass with well coordinated colors. Free of damage or repairs.Nice solid lamp.22'high with a 17" shade. Has 2 good old Arrow sockets with acorn chain pulls. Greatly reduced for quick sale.

LAMB BROS & GREENE OF NAPPANEE, INDIANA MADE HIGH QUALITY LAMPS DURING THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY INTO THE 1930'S.


Handel Greek Key

2,375

1st is a HANDEL totally arts and crafts GREEK KEY in the shade and base. Both are properly signed. The base has that great verdisgrn patina, stylized Greek key design and all correct, working hardware and rewired for safety.Measures 21" x 13"

HANDEL HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Table Lamp

2,775

Here is a nice arts and crafts HANDEL table lamp.23"high x 16" shade.Both properly signed and in good working order.Free of any chips or damage.


Handel Student Lamp

1,975

Here is a very nice properly signed HANDEL students lamp. Measuring a whopping 24" x 19".Excellent condition.


Tiffany Acorn Harp Lamp

7,475

Here is a super nice totally correct TIFFANY acorn harp lamp. The 10" shade has great mottled glass, , super coordinated colors and wonderful workmanship as one would expect of the great TIFFANY CO. I have shown the shade signature "TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK"
The base is of the gold doer patina, signed and numbered #423.

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant, multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects. Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement, challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in Tiffany's earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and nature assumed greater significance in Tiffany's work as he developed his unique approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art Nouveau.
In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own home. Colored glass, Tiffany's lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and 1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for sale.
Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork, furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in 1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom, company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany & Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.
By Tiffany's death on February 18, 1933, the popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffany's craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around the world, confirming Tiffany's legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY.


Handel Wall Sconces

2,275

Here for your consideration is a nice pair of HANDEL wall sconces. both shades and sconces are properly signed. The shades say HANDEL 3180 AND ARTIST RG.Both 5" x 4.5" shades are in excellent condition with flowers in bloom. The sconces have that wonderful verdisgrn patina.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Wall Sconces

2,650

Here for your consideration is a wonderful pair of HANDEL arts and crafts wall sconces. The shades are properly signed HANDEL and are the brick and loop style.Shades measure 6.5" x 4.5" and have that high grade galss.The wall sconses are also signed Handel and have that nice verdisgrn patina and have HUBBELL sockets.

HANDEL HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Palm Students Lamp

1,650

Here is a very nice HANDEL table lamp, with a 10" fitter shade. Has beautifully hand painted palms with great color and artist detail.The 22" Base has the organic theme and is properly signed with original hardware and rewired good patina as well.has the HANDEL name and numbered #2555.
HANDEL HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Pairpoint Sea Gull

1,750

Here for your consideration is the PAIRPOINT sea gull. The contemporary shade measures 16" and is hand painted with gulls, sky and water.Base is old and signed and shown in the Pairpoint book.The base is lighted for accent and a wonderful nite lite. Colors and workmanship are good. There is a special softness in the blending of the colors and artistry.

Background and History

Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s, lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production. There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy - blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally). Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp., 2) Patent Pending, 3) Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.

Bases were made of bronze, copper, brass, silver, or wood, and are always signed. As with most all makers of luxury goods, the company's sales lagged seriously during the Depression, and over time they lost touch with the changing tastes and styles of the public to some degree. Consequently, Pairpoint continued to experience financial difficulties, and some buildings and equipment were sold in 1938. The company reorganized in 1939 under the direction of Robert Gundersen and again specialized in quality hand-blown glassware. Isaac Babbit regained possession of the silver departments, and together they established Gundersen Glassworks, Inc. Following the end of WWII and after a sharp decline in sales, it again became necessary to reorganize yet again. The Gundersen-Pairpoint Glassworks was formed, and the old line of cut, engraved artware was reintroduced. The company moved to East Wareham, Massachusetts in 1957. Business continued to be poor, and the firm closed early in 1958. In 1970, Robert Bryden, sales manager for the company since the 1950s, tried to reestablish Pairpoint and new facilities were constructed in Sagamore. In 1974, the company began to produce lead glass cup plates which were made on commission as fund-raisers for various churches and organizations. These are signed with a 'P' in diamond and are becoming quite collectible.


Handel Poppy

1,875

Here is another really nice HANDEL table lamp hand painted poppies, vines and leaves on a domical glass shade. I actual have a pair of these beautiful painted shades and bases, all alike. The bases are properly signed Handel with the correct hardware and acorn chain pulls. The shades are also properly signed HANDEL 6790 and artist signed A.H. who is Authur Hall. These lamps are $1875 each and are in excellent original condition.Also it is fair mention, having a pair of up scale lamps like these generally increase their total value by 25%.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Boudior 6761

2,575

Here is another real rare and beautiful Handel table lamp with the very rare and beautiful oval shade. The shade measures 10" x 5" and is properly signed HANDEL 6761. Has soft, demur and colorful flowers in full bloom with chipped ice finish and Hubbell socket with acorn chain pull.The stylized tree trunk base stands 14 1/4" high with great patina with correct hardware.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Bradley & Hubbard Bronze Lamp

1075

For your consideration, this absolutely STUNNING SIGNED BRADLEY AND HUBBARD BRONZE HEAVY LAMP with HUBBELL SOCKETS, AND ORIGINAL LEADED MURANO SLAG GLASS SHADE WITH HUES OF ROSE, GREEN, AND AMBER.. gorgeous MURANO SLAG GLASS SHADE...STILL HAS ORIGINAL PAPER LABEL!!! DATED AUG. 1, 1905. GORGEOUS COLOR WHEN LIT!!! All panels are in excellent condition, save one panel, which has two tiny nicks near the edge of the frame..see last photo showing clearly, which are not noticeable. Has 3 early "HUBBELL sockets". The lamp measures 27" tall, the shade is 17" at the widest point.

A Brief Company History
1852-1940

The partnership of Nathaniel and William L. Bradley, Walter Hubbard, and Orson and Chitten Hatch began in Meriden, Connecticut in1852 as Bradley, Hatch & Company. Clocks were the sole product of the newly formed company.

When the Hatch brothers sold their interests in the firm two years later, Nathaniel Bradley, William Bradley and Walter Hubbard formed a company which they named simply Bradley and Hubbard. By 1856, they were producing call bells and sewing machines, but clocks continued to be the main line of production throughout the 1850's and 1860's.

Many northern manufacturers prospered immensely during the Civil War due to the expanded market west of the Mississippi and increased foreign exports. Bradley and Hubbard was no exception, adding the production of flags, hoop skirts, spring measuring tapes and match safes during the war years.

The discovery of oil in Pennsylvania in 1859 also had a great impact on the product line of Bradley & Hubbard with the decision to begin production of kerosene burning lamps. By 1871, kerosene virtually replaced whale oil for heating and illumination and new ways of burning it more efficiently were needed. Between 1868 and 1875, Bradley and Hubbard secured 33 patents relating to the design and mechanics of oil burning lamps (in all, the company would eventually patent a total of 238 designs and mechanical devices). The company was again reorganized in 1875, this time as a joint stock company renamed The Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company.

The Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company factory complex, ca1880.

Growing rapidly throughout the 1880's, the company added new products such as architectural grilles, railings, fences, window guards, and elevator enclosures. By the 1890's, the Bradley and Hubbard name was synonymous with high quality and artistic merit. Their products were marketed not only in their own showrooms in New York, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia, but also by a force of salesmen traveling throughout the country and by the large retail firms of Marshall Field & Company, Sears and Roebuck & Company, and Montgomery Ward & Company.

The Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company survived the Great Depression, but after 88 years in business, it was sold in 1940 to the Charles Parker Company, also of Meriden. Famous for its Parker sporting shotgun, the company also made household items such as coffee mills, waffle irons, lamps, locks, and door knockers. Upon the acquisition of the Bradley and Hubbard factories, the Parker Company instituted its Bradley and Hubbard Division with the stated intent of carrying on production of some products of the former company such as bathroom accessories, lighting fixtures, architectural bronzes and brass work. Within a year and a half after the purchase, the United States entered into WWII and the Parker Company turned its attention to the war effort. As the war escalated, all metal production was diverted to war related goods, making it unlikely that much, if anything, from the Bradley and Hubbard line was produced, unless for military use. By 1950, all references to a Bradley and Hubbard Division of the Parker Company had been dropped from the company's literature.

Finally, in 1976, a spectacular blaze totally destroyed the long abandoned Bradley and Hubbard factory buildings. Any records of the old Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company that were still in the building at the time were either burned or lost in the rubble when the shell was afterwards demolished.


Handel Boudoir 6704

2,250

Here for your pleasure to view and perhaps purchase is the Rare and collectable HANDEL boudoir #6704 table or desk lamp. All excellent and museum quality. Arguably the best example of the HANDEL boudoir lamps.Done in well coordinaded colors with great artistry as one would expect of the great HANDEL CO.measures 16" high with 8" point to point of the 6 sided shade, free of any damage or chips, correct hardware and rewired for safety. This is the rare molded shade that was in limited production 1919. Fully signed,numbered and artist signed K.W. That would be CATHERINE WELCH.

This beauty is shown on page #192 of the Defalco Hibel Handel book.

HANDEL HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Morgan Hanging Lamp

6,975

Here for your consideration is a super rare and beautiful MORGAN hanging lamp, a real conversation piece in any room. Super high quality glass which has that non shiny finish that MORGAN used. The massive shade measures a whopping 26" x 12". has the matching 12" ceiling canopy with hanging chains and 6 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Has that special lime green mottled back glass with exploded grapes with leaves and vines. Please notice the bronze leaf clusters and hooks. Has some tight heat lines. This beauty is found on page #114 of the PAUL CRIST MOSAIC SHADES II. Please see last pic for the book picture. This rare piece of American art lighting is correct in all ways including the original PERKINS push button switch as shown to enable turning on and off all 6 lites at once.

Marked down to sell at $6,975.00

MORGAN HISTORY

JOHN MORGAN & SONS 1902-1913- 32 EAST NINTH ST WITH MANUFACTURING IN BROOKLYN NEW YORK. The Morgan Brothers manufactured a whole range of superb lighting products. Morgan evolved a unique style of hammered copper metalwork.


Handel Boudoir 7512

2,495

Here for your consideration is yet another high quality HANDEL boudoir lamp, the best of the best.The 7" chipped ice shade is excellent and free of any chips whatever, just perfect.Is properly signed HANDEL and numbered 7512. This beauty has it all, coniferous trees and deciduous trees, ponds, sky and foilage.
The base stands 15" high with all original patina and hardware with acorn chain pull. Is properly signed HANDEL insized in the foot of the base and has the tag on the bottom.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Boudoir 6559

1,995

Here for your consideration is a very nice and rare HANDEL boudoir lamp. The 8" shade has six flat sides and hand painted on the reverse with poppies in full bloom, vines and leaves in strong well coordinated colors in nice detail. Like having a bouquet of fresh flowers on the table every day. The beautiful shade has the chipped ice finish and is properly signed HANDEL 6559 with artist KC which is KATHERNINE CASEY WELCH. The shade has a few very slight flea bites on the inside. The base stands 14.5" high with all it's original patina and hardware and has HANDEL impressed in the foot and the original felt bottom on the foot with the HANDEL cloth tag.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Poppy Lamp

3,350

Here for your consideration is a nice HANDEL poppy lamp with uneven border. Has repeat poppies in full bloom and green leaves, all well coordinated colors. The 18" shade has the HANDEL metal tag and has hundreds of pieces of colorful glass. This shade appears to have been made toward the end of HANDEL'S time in business around 1930.Is a very deep shade which requires a tall base.
The properly signed HANDEL base is 26"high and has the matching flowered design and fits perfectly with this HANDEL shade.has 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls and has been rewired for safety.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form the "Eydam and Handel Company" in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and was thereafter known as "Philip J. Handel" and then as "Handel and Company". "The Handel Company" originally incorporated on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip Handel's death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F. Handel, Philip's cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the economic slowdown of the late 1920's and resulting Great Depression had a devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Base

3,350

Here for your consideration is a very nice HANDEL floor lamp base.Properly signed, good patina, 5 original sockets and acorn chain pulls with the 5" shade support.Rewired for safety with the cloth wound cord and has the correct bakelite wall plug. Stands 66" high. Very heavy which insures stability


Wilkinson Table Lamp

1,150

**Stunning Wilkinson Table Lamp**

*Dimensions: 22"H x 17"W (widest point of shade)
*Condition: Very Good
*Circa: 1915

*This is an early WILKINSON as evidenced by being originally gas lit
*The chain pull that turns the lamp on and off, works very smoothly with no resistance or corrosion.
*The main color of the shade is a marbled green with "ruby red" around the lower rim - beautiful!
*The fret is in excellent condition.
*The light socket & plug are in good condition.
*There is one small crack & one small piece of green glass missing at top of shade - see pic 3. These slight imperfections can hardly be seen from the top. $1150 Low price for a genuine, century old WILKINSON LAMP.


Pendant Lamp

450

Here is a nice pendant lamp. Really beautiful, hand painted, great artistry and strong colors and looks like from the hand of Bidige with HANDEL.Both hooks are signed HANDEL, no signature on the shade.The shade measures 15" x 6.5" at the bulbous wide area. Comes complete with HUBBELL socket and acorn chain pull, ceiling canopy and chain which can be adjusted in length to suit.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Mica Lamp

5,500

Here is a very nice HANDEL mica lamp.The best of the arts and crafts lamps that HANDEL produced.
The mica shade measures 21" rim to rim and is properly signed and has the hammered copper.
The base stands 26" high and is also properly signed.Both shade and base are identified in the HANDEL books. This lamp is really nice.Has all the original hardware with 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn pulls and rewired for another century of dependable service.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Boudoir

2,375

Here is a super HANDEL molded shade desk lamp in excellent original condition which is saying a lot from 1919 The shade measures 7.5" and is very delicately hand painted with many finely painted butterfly's. Is signed HANDEL 6693 and is artist signed H.L. Has the chipped ice treatment and is free of any chips, flea bites or anything else.
The base is also properly signed HANDEL, 15.5" high with HUBBELL socket with acorn chain pull.Nice patina and rewired for safety.This lamp is shown on page #225 of the HANDEL Hilel/Fontaine book. $2375, this is a bargain low price as the good HANDEL BOUDOIR LAMPS are in the $4500 range.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000.00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100,000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Dugue Ceiling Lamp

895

Here is a nice Dugue ceiling lamp.Out standing lamp and colorful.
Things you might want to know about DEGUE ART GLASS
David Guron
(Degu), was the founder of the "Cristalleries De Compigne" this first
glassworks company mainly produced household glass in the early '20s.
Anticipating changes in the market he founded in 1926 a new factory, which he
called "Verrerie D'Art Degu" and put his full attention on the designing and
production of luxury art-glass. Guron mainly produced vases, lamps and
chandeliers. Due to the impending War he was only on production for a short
period of time (1926-1932). His new factory and art glass production ended too
soon. He fled France and was last seen in Paris in 1949.

Original Degue lamp fixture with two center lights and three sockets. The fixture has been repainted. I believe there were originally three "roses" near the top,now there are two,but I do not know for sure. THe fixture will hang down 40 inches from a ceiling when intact. Includes lovely pate de verre bowl with three matching shades. All shades are marked "Degue". I do not see a mark on the fixture. The bowl measures 13-3/4 inches in diameter and it is 4 inches deep. The smaller shades are 3-3/4 inches square at the base and 5-1/2 inches tall. The fitter holes are close to 1-1/8 inches in diameter. The shades have no chips or cracks. There are some scuffs and one has a white patch that measures 1/2 by 3/4 inches,about the size of a price sticker. The fixture will be shipped disassembled. As with any vintage lamp, it will have to be rewired before use for safety.

French Art Nouveau ceiling light designed by David Gueron. He operated his studio "Verriers d'Art Degue" in Paris from 1926 until the German invasion of 1939.


Muller Freres Lamp Fixture

995

Original Muller Freres lamp fixture with two center lights and three sockets. The fixture will hang down 39 inches from a ceiling when intact. The arms were wired onto the sockets to hold them in place. I cut the wires before packaging. I am not sure what is needed for correct reassembly? Includes lovely pate de verre bowl with three matching shades. All shades are marked "Muller Freres". I do not see a mark on the fixture. The bowl measures 15-3/4 inches in diameter and it is 4-1/2 inches deep. It is in good condition with no chips or cracks. There are scuffs and scratches from use. The smaller shades are 4-1/4 inches across at the base and 5-3/4 inches tall. 2-1/4" fitters. There are no chips or cracks. There are some scuffs. The fixture will be shipped disassembled. As with any vintage lamp, Will be properly rewired for safety before shipping.

French Art Nouveau ceiling light designed by Muller Freres circa 1920's.

Muller Frres Lunville

The large Muller family originated from Kalhauzen and rested on a long tradition of glass workers. When the German Empired annexed the Elsace in 1871, the Muller family fled (9 brothers and 1 sister) to the quieter Lunville. The two oldest brothers, Dsir and Eugne Muller, ended up in the glassworks of Emile Gall, where they learned how to produce art glass ( 1885). The other family members found work in several other glassworks in the surroundings of Lunville and developed into recognised glassdecorators. Moreover Henri, Pierre and Victor Muller also ended up working for Gall.

Around 1895 the time seemed ripe for Henri Muller to set up an independent glass workshop in Lunville (rue the Sainte Anne). His brothers reacted enthusiastically and soon joined him, as a result of which the Muller Frres glassworks became a fact. The Mullers mastered all well-known glass decorating techniques and always experimented with new methods. They developed rapidly into a renowned company and established their name for their large diversity and quality (colour setting, decoration and design of their vases and lamps).

During the beginning of the 20th century they made multiple luxuriously glass objects in the art nouveau style and also provided some designs (Henri and Eugne Muller were responsible for some 144 designs in the years 1904 -1906) for the Belgian "Cristallerie de Val Saint-Lambert" where Georges Deprez was the general director. Their work can be compared in style and quality with Daum.

During the first World War the Muller Frres glassworks closed its doors and the family members spread out over France, working for different glassworks (for instance Camille, Jean and Auguste went to "Landier Et Houdaille" in Svres and mile worked at Choisi-Le-Roi). Unfortunately Eugne died in the war, but that didn't hold back the remaining brothers to start again after the war. They bought the factory "Hinzelin" in Lunville and started commercial production of chandaliers and wallbrackets. In this period they designed a typical Art Deco line, where decorations of animals and landscapes were striking beautiful. After crash on the New York stock exchange in America business went down for the Muller Frres and in 1936 they definitively closed their glassworks.


Handel #7105

4,975

Here is a very nice HANDEL table lamp #7105. In full beautiful blooming roses and vines. Shade measures 18" properly signed and free of any chips, cracks or repairs. has the sand finish, litely chipped ice finish, really nice. Like having a bouquet of fresh flowers in the room every day. Shown on page 152 of the Fontaine/Hible HANDEL LAMP book. The base is the rare Handel tree trunk with correct hardware, properly signed and rewired for another near century of dependable service.


Pittsburgh Table Lamp

875

Up for your pleasure is a double signed Pittsburgh reverse painted table lamp. The shade is reverse painted on a 14" acid etched shade. The reverse painted shade has cascading lavender wisteria flowers surrounded with green leaves. The colors are clean and crisp and the flowers are so life like. This lamp does not come around on the market very often. The base is original to the shade and is equipped with 2 old Leviton pull chain sockets. It is double signed with the Pittsburgh logo P. L. B. & G. CO #2003 & #2051. It has been rewired with a brown period cloth cord and old plug. The base has a dark green painted finish that compliments the shade perfectly. The pictures really show the beauty of this lamp and gives the best description so take a good look. This is one fantastic lamp. The shade is free of any chips, cracks or repairs. I have listed a picture of this lamp from the reference book "Better Electric Lamps of the 20's and 30's. It can be seen in picture 12. This is an opportunity for you to own a great Pittsburgh lamp.


Pittsburgh Lamp

875

Up for your pleasure is an antique art nouveau Pittsburgh lamp base for a reverse painted shade. This base is referred to as the "owl" base and if you view the 3rd picture you can see why also. It has beautiful detail and lines in the art nouveau style, finish commensurate with age. The base is in stable condition and will support a large shade. The base is 23" tall to the top of the finial and is signed on the loader plate P. L. B. & G. CO #2159. It has 3 P & S (Pass & Seymour) pull chain sockets with the porcelain liners. I will properly rewire before shipping. Please view all the pictures as they give the best description of this lamp base. An opportunity for you to own a great antique lamp base.


Pittsburgh Palm Tree

975

Here for your considration is a very nice PITTSBURHG lited base table lamp. is of the south seas with palm trees, very nice and free of any chips, cracks or repairs and has good hardware. $975, low price for this beauty.

THE PITTSBURGH " PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, ACHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFULLAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THEUPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TOTHE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Handel Table Lamp

2,475

Totally arts and crafts, museum quality antique circa 1915 American Handel table lamp. The lamp has a brass base and a metal overlay and hand painted slag glass shade. Really a beauty, all original and rewired for another century of dependable and safe service. The shade measures just less than 9 inches or 23 cm high, and is 15 inches or 39. 5 cm in diameter. Both a practical desk top reading lamp and esthetically beautiful.

The lamp has a bronze patina, white metal, with four ball feet which sits on a stepped base and a square column stem. The lamp has three good old original sockets, and acorn chain pulls. The shade is metal slag glass overlay with high quality root beer, caramel slag glass inserts. There are a total of 24 glass panels. Twelve of the panels have hand painted accents in green and red on the leaves and berries. The bottom of the base has a pattern number "5187". There are similar examples to this type of lamp in the book Metal Overlays by Handel by Robert Defalco pages 12 and 30. The inside of the shade is signed "HANDEL".

This beautiful lamp is in excellent origonal condition and super rare. Low price for quick sale $2475. 00

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Pine Slope Lamp

4,950

Here for your consideration is a super rare HANDEL Pine Slope lamp. Museum quality, does not get any better then this beautiful lamp. Is the very early lamp that was kerosene and converted to electric with the actual HANDEL supplied kit while utilizing the original oil reservoir and mechanical. The shade is the 18" panel overlay with high quality colorful glass depicting the sunset. All overlay and glass is original and free of any repairs, chips or cracks and is properly signed HANDEL as shown. The base is 24" high in good patina and has all the original hardware and acorn chain pulls. Has been rewired for another century of dependable service. A very rare, fine piece of American art lighting history.

HANDEL LAMP HISTORY
The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Ceiling Light

795

Vintage Arts and Crafts, Mission/Craftsman Ceiling Light stamped HANDEL
Beautiful leaded slag glass panels measure 8. 5" x 5" each
All the panels are in wonderful condition with no cracks or chips in the glass.
Length of Fixture from top of hardware to bottom of glass is 18"
and is approximately 7"x 7" square
Brass hanging hardware is in good shape
Please see pictures for details.
It is in good working condition.
Please note, the chain pull has been replaced with a long acorn chain pull.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Chicago Mosaic

1,975

Here is a very nice and rare CHICAGO MOSAIC table lamp. Properly signed and measures a whopping 18 1/2" x 23". Has the correct hardware, patina and acorn chain pulls. The high quality colorful glass is well coordinated and performs nicely. Reduced from $2, 950 to $1, 975 for quick sale. Low price for this high quality beauty.

CHICAGO MOSAIC HISTORY

The Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, c. 1910s.
"Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps, and are highly collectible.

The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic.


Pittsburgh Desk Lamp

295

Up for auction is an antique brass adjustable desk lamp in very good condition with no damage. It works, adjusts up and down. The case glass amber shade is good with no chips or cracks. It is 19" tall and about 13" wide. The shade is 6 1/2" in diameter. A fine antique desk lamp.
Although not signed, the bottom weight looks like Pittsburgh. Nonetheless, provides a beautiful antique lamp which is practical, providing good none glare lite for the desk/table top.


Moe Bridges Table Lamp

3,350

For your consideration is perhaps the nicest, super high quality, top of the line MOE BRIDGES table lamp in museum quality condition. The flowered 18" shade is properly signed MOE BRIDGES CO. 202. The artistry and well coordinated colors in the keen definition of this shade is the best ever. The exterior has the chipped ice finish which adds the 3 dimension and makes the shade perform. No chips or cracks.
The base stands 22. 5", is fully signed as shown. In excellent original condition in all ways, even has the Moe Bridges chain pulls. Sometimes they get it right, this is one of those times. Priced low to sell $3350.

THE MOE-BRIDGES LAMP COMPANY WAS STARTED IN THE EARLY 1900"S BY HENRIK MOE
AND C. A. BRIDGES AND LOCATED IN MILWAUKEE WITH SALES OFFICES IN 9 MAJOR CITIES.
. AT THAT TIME WAS THE LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF HIGH GRADE LIGHTING IN THE
COUNTRY WITH OVER 200, 000 SQ. FT. FLOOR SPACE. ON MARCH 23, 1923 GEORGE LUDWIG
WITH THE COMPANY TOOK OUT A PATENT. MOE-BRIDGES SPECIALIZED IN BEAUTIFUL AND
POPULAR REVERSE PAINTED LAMPS WITH EMPHASES ON HIGH QUALITY. Designs on
Moe-Bridges lamps often feature landscapes with forest or country scenes that
typically include a water element. PERFECTION WAS PARAMOUNT AND NO SIGNATURE OF
GUARANTEE TAG WAS APPLIED UNTIL EACH WORK OF ART PASSED A RIGOROUS FINAL
INSPECTION. IN 1934 THE COMPANY WAS PURCHASED BY THE ELECTRIC SPRAYIT CO. TODAY
THE MOE-BRIDGES ARE HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND FETCH UP TO $10, 000 AT AUCTION.


Pairpoint Table Lamp

3,875

Here is a really super Museum quality, PAIRPOINT table lamp. Described in The MALAKOFF PAIRPOINT BOOK on page 113. This is the rare exotic birds in flight is the sought after black backgroundand colorful flowers in bloom. This style is the EXETER 17" diameter x 21. 5" high. Both shade and base properly signed with the base also numbered, has all the pedigree. The base has the 3 feet and stylized GREEK KEY on either side of each foot. Pairpoint went all out on this beauty. An important piece of historical American art lighting. $3875

Background and History
Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880
in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first
made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington
Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring
synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s,
lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production.
There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy -
blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse
painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually
executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally).
Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic
shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower
inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp. , 2) Patent Pending, 3)
Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were
frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted
effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse
painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a
perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.

Bases were made of bronze,
copper, brass, silver, or wood, and are always signed. As with most all makers
of luxury goods, the company's sales lagged seriously during the Depression, and
over time they lost touch with the changing tastes and styles of the public to
some degree. Consequently, Pairpoint continued to experience financial
difficulties, and some buildings and equipment were sold in 1938. The company
reorganized in 1939 under the direction of Robert Gundersen and again
specialized in quality hand-blown glassware. Isaac Babbit regained possession of
the silver departments, and together they established Gundersen Glassworks, Inc.
Following the end of WWII and after a sharp decline in sales, it again became
necessary to reorganize yet again. The Gundersen-Pairpoint Glassworks was
formed, and the old line of cut, engraved artware was reintroduced. The company
moved to East Wareham, Massachusetts in 1957. Business continued to be poor, and
the firm closed early in 1958. In 1970, Robert Bryden, sales manager for the
company since the 1950s, tried to reestablish Pairpoint and new facilities were
constructed in Sagamore. In 1974, the company began to produce lead glass cup
plates which were made on commission as fund-raisers for various churches and
organizations. These are signed with a 'P' in diamond and are becoming quite
collectible.
The Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford,
MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor,
Mt. Washington Glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and
glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories
including the well known Pairpoint lamps.


Handel Chinese Lamp

3,500

Here for your consideration is perhaps the most rare of the rare Handel lamp bases. This base is shown in the Handel Books with the 18" Mt. Fuji shade and others of the top flight Handel shades. Very heavy six footed with 3 Hubbell sockets and acorn chain pulls. The patina is original and excellent. Has been rewired for safety. On the body of the base are two sections with bamboo trees, one with bird in flight and one with flowers. Measures 24" high and 8. 5" at the widest part. Has that really cool oriental flare and is described in the Handel book as "bronzed metal bulbous base molded with flowers, with the foot molded as a Chinese stand. " A very rare and special fully signed Handel lamp base.


Super rare HANDEL CHINESE LAMP. The great FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT said " one should keep some CHINESE works of art in their homes".
This wonderful HANDEL piece is just that. Notice the Chinese gently curved feet and the oriental birds incised in the casting. The 6 panels on the shade are hand painted and artist signed as shown. The properly signed Handel lamp stands 24" high with a 16" shade. I tried to get the best pix of the shade I could and endeavored to avoid the camera flash. This super rare HANDEL lamp base alone sells for $3500. I will sell the whole lamp for $3500.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel #6577

2,875

Hello, here is the Killer of the HANDEL loaf lamps. . Arts and Crafts to the max. Does not get any better then this beauty and very moderate price. Shade and base properly signed. In the book, the description is. 8 inch glass shade in the chipped ice, decorated on the interior with a scene of trees, a lake and a moon on a bronzed adjustable base. #6577. $ 2875 PLUS SHIPPING.


Leaded Glass Table Lamp

775

Here is a nice American made leaded glass table lamp. May be a Pittsburgh, Bradley Hubbard or Phonix.
Measures 22" high x 16" shade. Nice well coordinaded colors and good workmanship. Shade and base started life together 90 years ago. A beautiful lamp priced to sell.


Fulper Hanging Lamp

450

Here is a nice properly signed FULPER hanging lamp. Has that deco look and measures 14" x 6" Has the chipped ice finish with the FULPER racetrack signature which id incised in the surface of the glass.
Can be sold as you see it now for $450. Or I can provide and install all the chain and hardware, with ceiling canopy for an additional $150. Either way a special and rare lamp.


Suess Peony

17,500

Here is a very nice and rare SUESS Peony. Measures a massive 22" shade x 25. 5" high. The shade has that colorful high quality glass and is properly "rarely signed " SUESS ORNAMENTAL GLASS CO. "If you like flowers in full bloom, this lamp is for you.
The solid bronze base is very heavy and has 4 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Rewired for safety. Great patina in shade and base.
This lamp sold at Skinners auction house in Boston for much more then my asking price of $17, 500.
Also this lamp is shown in the SUESS pictorial lamp book as shown.

MAX SUESS

SUESS ORNAMENTAL GLASS AND LAMP CO. 750 -760 TROOP STREET
CHICAGO, ILLS.
CIRCA 1895 - 1908. THE SUESS CO. WAS CREATED IN CHICAGO BY A GROUP
OF TALENTED ARTISTS THAT DESIRED TO MAKE SUPERIOR LAMPS TO RIVAL
TIFFANY. SOME OF THE ARTISTS AND WORKMAN LEFT TIFFANY CO. FOR SUESS. THEY USED
THE FINEST GLASS AND WORKMANSHIP AND DESIGNS. HERE IS A QUOTE FROM THE SUESS
BOOK "WE HAVE SPARED NO PAINS WHATSOEVER IN THE DESIGN, MATERIAL OR WORKMANSHIP
OF OUR LAMPS TO GIVE FULL VALUE. AT MUCH EXPENSE WE HAVE SOUGHT TO PRODUCE
ORIGINAL COLORS, AND DESIGNS THAT YOU MAY HAVE PROPER CONCEPTION OF THEIR
BEAUTY. OUR SUESS LAMPS REPRESENT THE HIGHEST ARTISTIC TALENT IN DESIGN, THE BEST
MATERIAL AND THE MOST SKILLFUL CRAFTSMANSHIP OBTAINABLE. " TODAY THE SUESS LAMPS
ARE RARE AND COVETED AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES WHEN THEY COME AVAILABLE. MAY
23, 1908 A BOX COMPANY NEXT DOOR CAUGHT FIRE AND BURNED SUESS TO THE GROUND,
ENDING PRODUCTION


Morgan Table Lamp

7,975

This great and very rare lamp is the MORGAN DOUBLE ROSE. Identified in the Mosaic Shade book II, page #111 and on www. leadedglass. com
Really a rare and beautiful lamp. The shade measures a whopping 24". Four correct sockets, and correct in all ways. Colors ore strong and really performs well.

The Base, is 100% original Morgan with old matching Hubbell sockets and acorn pulls. Has a fantastic dark brown/green patina.
The James D. Julia auction house is willing to put this nice lamp up for auction with a $11, 000 reserve with expectation of bringing at least that much.

An important piece of American Art Lighting History.
A real bargain at $7, 975.

JOHN MORGAN Lamp; SONS 1902-1913- 32 EAST NINTH ST WITH
MANUFACTURING IN BROOKLYN NEW YORK. The Morgan Brothers manufactured a whole
range of superb lighting products. Morgan evolved a unique style of hammered
copper metalwork.


Whaley Table Lamp

1,975

Awesome Leaded Glass Lamp J. A. Whaley.

Lamp stands 24" tall. Shade is 19" wide 6" deep.

No separations.

last 2 pictures show fractures, none loose all tight.

Properly signed J. A. Whaley on the bottom of the base. Has nice patina.

3 Sockets all totally re wired with period style brown cloth cord acorn style plug.


Gustav Stickley 5 Lite Chandlier

28,950

Here is a very rare GUSTAV STICKLEY 5 lite chandlier. #223. Is excellent and correct in all ways.
Super rare and valuable. Barbara Streisand sold her's for $68, 000 plus auction juice.
I have the complete provenance of this lamp. I am selling my big home and downsizing to Naples Fl. This great and rare lamp has hung in my library for decades. This Gus #223 is properly signed and shown on page #163 of the "EARLY WORKS OF GUSTAV STICKLEY " book. Will sell for $42, 500. I also have a Gustav Stickley wall sconce, also properly signed as shown which I would sell for $1875

Gustav Stickley was born March 9, 1858 in Osceola, Wisconsin and
died April 21, 1942 in Syracuse, New York.
First trained as a stone mason, Stickley preferred to work in wood and
dreamed of building fine tables and chairs. He learned furniture making at his
uncle's chair factory in Lanesboro, Pennsylvania. Traveling to Europe in 1896,
he met notable Arts and Crafts designers. The following year he returned to the
United States and founded the United Crafts of Eastwood, New York. In 1904, he
founded the Craftsman Workshops. The furniture he designed and made was mostly
of native American oak. It was of a sturdy-plain design in contrast to the
highly decorated late Victorian pieces. Joinery was exposed and upholstery was
carried out in canvas and leather (natural materials). It became known as
Mission Style. Stickley's designs were exhibited at the prestigious Grand Rapids
and Pan American furniture expositions. The Stickley operations turned out high quality copper works, trays, lamps and hardware. All very desirable and valuable.
>


Whaley Floral

3,650

Up for sale is this an antique extremely rare well-known J. A. Whaley documented floral stained leaded slag glass table lamp arts&crafts design, circa 1900, s. Let, s start from the shade-it has 18 1/2 inches in diameter. It is a very colorful shade with a medium green/white/yellow background wavy geometric pattern, dark green leaves, red and purple flowers/poinsettia/ and little yellow buds in the lower wavy bottom. I made a pictures with and with out flash, so you can see strike colors. Just outstanding, very reach lead work with original patina. The lamp base has 25 inches tall and 8 inches by 8 inches bottom, very ornate. Also as you can see it has original verdigris/greenish/"frog skin" patina. The shade has a few/4-5 / hairline cracks but keeps very strong structure. The lamp base has 3 original Hubbel sockets with backelite switch on/off. That lamp you can see on page Whaley lamps in website leaded lamp dot com and in the Paul Crist book "MOSAIC SHADES" on page 101 upper row. Priced low to sale $3650. Shipping cost in lower 48 states of the USA is $100. 00.


Handel Boudoir

call

Here is a nice Handel boudoir lamp with an unusual shade. Measures 14" high x 8" at it's widest. The base is properly signed, the shade is cased glass for good light distribution and for sure belongs with this Handel base but is not signed.


Handel Cat Tail

6,750

Here is the top of the line of the great museum quality HANDEL LAMPS. This is the HANDEL CAT TAIL. A large lamp with the properly signed twice 20" shade. All the hand painting is of excellent artistry and strong well coordinated colors as one would expect of the great HANDEL CO. The base stands a tall 26" has HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls and is also properly signed on the foot. A massive HANDEL table lamp that is the conversation piece in any room. Rewired for another century of service. Priced to sell and a great investment at $6750 which will bring beauty to one's home every day.

Please see the Handel cat tail below that sold at Craftsman's Auction in 2006 for $51, 000. Mine is the same base and shade except 2"smaller shade.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.

Handel - lot 97 March 2006

HANDEL Table lamp, its large faceted slag-glass shade with brown and green cattails over a bronzed base. Excellent example, marvelous condition. Base is stamped HANDEL. 28" x 22"

Sold for: $51, 000 March 2006 Auction


Shop Of The Crafters Arts And Crafts Hanger

2,350

Here is a very nice and properly signed SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS arts and crafts hanger. In excellent condition. All quarter sawed oak including the chain, ceiling canopy and frame. The glass is textured and really dances. The shade is 23" and hangs 40".

Shop of the Crafters at Cincinnati, whom has long been accorded preeminence
of the arts and crafts movement, producing sophisticated and significant designs
of inlaid and other fine furnishings in the mission style. Oscar Onken's Shop of
the Crafters opened in 1904 and discontinued operations under that name in
1919.

THE SHOP OF THE CRAFTERS FURNITURE CO. WAS STARTED IN CINCINNATI BY OSCAR
ONKEN IN 1906 UNTIL 1919. SOC. WAS KNOWN FOR THEIR HIGH QUALITY HAND MADE
FURNITURE AND LIGHTING. SOC USED ONLY THE FINEST QUARTER SAWED WHITE
OAK AND SUPERB WORKMANSHIP.


Whaley Leaded Glass Lamp

1,575

UP FOR CONSIDERATION IS A WHALEY LONG PETAL LEADED GLASS LAMP. THIS LAMP IS SHOWN ON LEADED LAMPS. COM. STRONG ARTS AND CRAFTS STYLE. THE LAMP STANDS 22" TO THE TOP OF THE FINIAL AND THE FOOT IS 9 1/4" WIDE AT THE WIDEST POINT. THE SHADE IS 18" IN DIA AND 7 1/4" TALL. THE SHADES HAS 3 SKIRT PANELS WITH TIGHT HEAT LINES NO LOOSE GLASS. WHICH IS COMMON WITH OLD SHADES. THE LEADING HAS A NICE BROWN COLOR FROM A HIGHEND LAMP CO. THE BASE HAS ALL ORIG. PARTS EXCEPT THE RISER LOOKS TO HAVE BEEN REPLACED YOU BE THE JUDGE ITS SHOWN IN THE PICTURES. THERE ARE TWO HARVEY HUBBELL SOCKETS THAT WORK. THE BASE HAS BEEN REWIRED AND HAS A VINTAGE HUBBELL PLUG. I TOOK LOTS OF PICTURES SELLING AS -IS A GREAT ARTS AND CRAFTS LEADED GLASS LAMP. Priced very low to sell quickly. Ha, can you imagine a lamp of this caliber selling for this low amount. $1575 THE SHIPPING IS SET AT 125. 00


Handel Boudoir

995

Here for your consideration is a nice properly signed HANDEL boudoir lamp. The 7" shade has great glass and workmanship and signed with the typical HANDEL metal tag. Throws off beautiful coppery romantic lite.
The base is signed twice as shown, in good condition with correct hardware and rewired


1920s Jefferson Table Lamp

995

White metal base measures 23" tall by 7 3/4". in working order- new cord and plug. glass shade measures 7 1/4" tall by 18 inches diameter. shade is signed: 1372 Jefferson company MS. shallow chip to bottom edge. Some minor Enamel paint touch up of the landscape in brown and olive yellow.
Because of these mentioned minor flaws, price is super low.

THE JEFFERSON LAMP CO. WAS 1ST ESTABLISHED IN 1900 IN STEUBENVILLE, OHIO A
RENOWNED AREA FOR GLASS MAKING. THE CO. MOVED TO FOLLANBEE, W. VA. IN 1907 AND
WENT BANKRUPT IN 1933. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN A RARE AND FINE PIECE OF PERIOD
AMERICAN LIGHTING THAT IS BEAUTIFUL AND HISTORICALLY POWERFUL


Glass Handel Tiffany Style Lamp By Gorham

3,650

This lamp is a really great example from a superior quality maker by the name of Gorham. They did make some fabulous lamps. . . . . . and this is one of them. Just look at the construction of the shade. Very, VERY, thin lead lines. Very, VERY, tiny pieces of glass. Super design with outstanding shading. Just really well done all the way around. In terms of dimensions, the shade is 17 1/2" in diameter and the lamp stands 21 1/2" tall. The shade has an intertwining fleur-de-lis pattern with nicely matched glass that really accentuates the design. Just a great Arts & Crafts look. . . . . just imagine how it would look on your Stickley table! The simple trumpet style base is still of superior quality and is solid bronze with a cast iron weight in the bottom. . . . . . it alone weighs over 10 pounds! It is fitted with nice old Hubbell sockets with their original interiors and acorn pull chains. If you have been looking for a very fine example of Gorham's work, this is the one for you. They don't get much better than this in terms of color or condition, so don't let this one pass you by.

The Gorham Mfg. Co. stands out as the only firm to
outdo Tiffany in the ostentation of their work. Perhaps because they were
already accomplished in bronze and silver work, they added a leaded shade studio
in 1905. This impressive model is one of their most elaborate
creations. The shade is made up of hundreds of high quality individual pieces of glass, far
surpassing anything Tiffany attempted at a comparable scale.


Tiffany Harp Lamp

4,950

Super Rare. Here is a very nice TIFFANY harp lamp complete with the correct 7"shade. Please notice the high quality mottled glass and superb workmanship. The shade is properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK. Free of any damage or repairs.
The base has the original patina is properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK and is numbered #418, as shown. Has the correct hardware and GECO switch and works well.

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS
JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art
glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking
technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant,
multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the
traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects.
Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement,
challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing
designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in
Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and
nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique
approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most
important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art
Nouveau.

In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany
began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own
home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and
inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps
represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of
the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and
1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for
sale.

Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and
windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork,
furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in
1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing
lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom,
company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do
with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable
career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany &
Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces
and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.

By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the
popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and
Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were
forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that
his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys
craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern
Art.

Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around
the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND
MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY


Steuben Pair

275 ea

Early 1900s STEUBEN Calcite GOLD AURENE Lined LAMP SHADE

Here is a very nice pair of properly signed STEUBEN shades. Measuring 6" dia. x 3" high with the 2 1/4" fitter. $275 each or $500 for the pair. This set of Steubens really perform well.

Steuben Glass Works was an American art glass manufacturer, founded in the summer of 1903 by Fredrick C. Carder and Thomas G. Hawkes in Corning, New York, which is in Steuben County, from which the company name was derived. Hawkes was the owner of the largest cut glass firm then operating in Corning. Carder was an Englishman (born 18 September 1863) who had many years' experience designing glass for Stevens and Williams in England. Hawkes purchased the glass blanks for his cutting shop from many sources and eventually wanted to start a factory to make the blanks himself. Hawkes convinced Carder to come to Corning and manage such a factory. Carder, who had been passed over for promotion at Stevens and Williams, consented to do so.

Steuben Glass Works started operation in October 1903. Carder produced blanks for Hawkes and also began producing cut glass himself. Carder's great love was colored glass and had been instrumental in the reintroduction of colored glass while at Stevens and Williams. When Steuben's success at producing blanks for Hawkes became assured, Carder began to experiment with colored glass and continued experiments that were started in England. He soon perfected Gold Aurene which was similar to iridescent art glass that was being produced by Tiffany and others. Gold Aurene was followed by a wide range of colored art glass that eventually was produced in more than 7, 000 shapes and 140 colors.

Steuben Glass Works continued to produce glass of all sorts until World War I. At that time war time restrictions made it impossible for Steuben to acquire the materials needed to continue manufacture. The company was subsequently sold to Corning Glass Works and became the Steuben Division. Carder continued as Division manager without any real change in the company's operation except that he now had reporting responsibilities to Corning Glass Works' management. Corning's management tried, mostly unsuccessfully, to limit the articles that Steuben made to only the most popular. Production continued until about 1932.

In 1932 there was a major change in Steuben management. The nationwide depression had limited the sale of Steuben and there was also a lessening of public interest in colored glass. In February 1932, John MacKay was appointed to Carder's position and Carder became Art Director, Corning Glass Works. Steuben then produced primarily colorless art glass.

Steuben still produced colored art glass mostly to fill special orders. A few new colors were added after Carder lost control of the company, but the last known sale for colored art glass by Steuben was in 1943.


Peacock Lamp

1,250

Here is a very nice and colorful Peacock lamp/ If you like PEACOCKS, this beauty is for you. The base has PEACOCKS in full feather with the shade also having PEACOCKS. Has 3 HUBBELL sockets with ACORN CHAIN PULLS. Bright and colorful with great artistry. Albeit not signed, surely done by a high end lamp com.


Handel Mosserine

2,675

RARE, RARE HANDEL MOSSERINE TOTALLY ARTS AND CRAFTS

MAJESTIC c. 1920 HANDEL ARTS AND CRAFTS MOSSERINE LAMP W/ LARGE BROWN SHADE AND BRONZE BASE

We are very proud to offer to you a great Handel lamp. This particular lamp is an amazing find and we love the simplicity and fabulous design of this lamp. The shade is a gorgeous mosserine, with a coppery amber brown lite thrown off when lit and a subdued earthy brown when unlit. Has the patented Handel chiped ice which reflects the lite to insure good performance of the high quality glass. This is an amazing lamp and is in excellent condition. Measures 22" in. tall and 18" in. wide. Has cased glass interior for even lite distribution and avoidance of bulb glare.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Tiffany Apple Blossom Table Lamp

29,875

Here for our consideration is a for real TIFFANY APPLE BLOSSOM table lamp. The shade measures 16" diameter and is properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YOUR and is numbered #1455-3. The dash 3 indicates this is a special lamp shade "superior". The high grade glass is really colorful with really outstanding workmanship, as we have come to expect of the great TIFFANY LAMP CO.
The base is solid bronze and also properly signed and numbered #363 and stands 22" high. Has been rewired for safety.
LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS
JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art
glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking
technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant,
multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the
traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects.
Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement,
challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing
designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in
Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and
nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique
approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most
important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art
Nouveau.
In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany
began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own
home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and
inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps
represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of
the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and
1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for
sale.
Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and
windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork,
furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in
1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing
lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom,
company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do
with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable
career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany &
Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces
and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.
By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the
popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and
Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were
forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that
his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys
craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern
Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around
the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND
MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY


Duffner And Kimberly Table Lamp

2,450

Here is a nice DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY table lamp has a nice 16" shade with great glass that throws off coppery romantic lite. The 22" high base is really nice as well. Great original hardware with 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls.

DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY HISTORY

The was formed in late 1905 with a substantial capital
investment of $300, 000, an enormous amount of money in that day and within
months was able to bring to market an impressive line of leaded portables and
fixtures. Duffner & Kimberly tried to carve a separate niche for themselves
by concentrating on high period styles, a genre that Tiffany had largely
neglected. The company began operations with great ambitions and an impressive
array of lamps, but their timing proved unfortunate. Almost from the beginning,
they were beset by financial difficulties and never able to expand their
top-of-the-line offerings much beyond their initial line. Nevertheless, Duffner
& Kimberly left us with an impressive legacy, the depth and scope of which
we are only just beginning to appreciate. Their best lamps reflect a high level
of craftsmanship and a sophisticated eye for design that certainly merits
comparison with anything Tiffany was capable of producing. On the other hand,
some of their simpler lamps exhibit a remarkable creative flair. and it is
apparent that they explored the possibilities of the medium to a greater extent
than Tiffany ever attempted.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

2,875

Please see my 18" WILKINSON table lamp. Really nice. This lamp has it all. Great design, super well coordinated glass coloring and really nice workmanship. Notice this lamp have the rare bayonet locking shade ring.
The base stands a whopping 24" tall and has 3 HUBBELL sockets appears to be solid bronze, is rewired and properly signed as shown.

WILKINSON LAMP CO. HISTORY

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN
1909 AT 45 YORK ST. BROOKLYN, NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE
TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE
BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS. WILKINSON was full of innovative new ideas. THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS
OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO. INTO
BANKRUPTCY IN 1915.
Today the WILKINSONS command high money.


Green Handel Table Lamp

1,975

Here is a nice HANDEL totally arts and crafts Handel table lamp. All the glass in the 20" shade is of high quality and really performs well. Has an usual beaded edge.
The 23" base is really rare. Has all the original hardware and rewired for another century of dependable service. 3HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Is signed as shown.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Boudoir Table Lamp

775

Here is a very nice HANDEL boudoir table lamp. The art craft shade measures 10" Dia. and is very nicely done. Is not signed.
The 15" base is properly signed HANDEL and is hammered copper with HUBBELL socket and rewired for safety.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Antique Pairpoint Parrots Lamp

6,500

Here for your consideration is the Rare of the Rarest 18" PAIRPOINT EXOTIC BIRDS IN FLIGHT lamp. Properly signed with artist H. FISHER. Because of the lamor intensive investment from the Pairpoint lamp co. the run of production was limited. Not many were made, very few have survined.
If you like Pairpoint and Birds, this lovely Antique Pairpoint Lamp with Reverse Painted Chipped Ice Parrots & Tropical Shade is for you. This lamp is in Excellent Original Working Condition with no issues at all. The finnial and heatcap are pairpoint and are a match for the lamp. The tri arm base is silver plated and the chipped ice shade has an artist signature. A bit hard to make out but we believe it is H Fisher. The lamp measures 23" in total height, the shade measures 18" in diameter x 7 1/2" tall x 2 1/2" at the top hole. A very unique platued shape to the shade. The base is marked with the pairpoint mark and Pairpoint D3070. The lamp has been rewired at one point. An exceptional example of a Pairpoint lamp with the highly desirable chipped ice shade with a wonderful birds in flight with a tropical landscape.

Be it known that I, ALBERT STEFFIN, a citizen of the United
States, residing at New Bedford. in the county of Bristol and State of
Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful improvements in the
Manufacture of Glass Shades and Screens, of which the following is a
specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawing. The object of my
invention is to provide articles of different forms for different purposes, such
as shades for covering lamps and screens for admitting light which articles are
mad up of numerous pieces of molded glass, each piece of glass being shaped with
irregular raised surface, and the entire article being a harmonious combination
of the various molded pieces. . . "

Background and History
Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880
in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first
made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington
Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring
synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s,
lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production.
There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy -
blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse
painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually
executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally).
Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic
shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower
inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp. , 2) Patent Pending, 3)
Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were
frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted
effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse
painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a
perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.

Bases were made of bronze,
copper, brass, silver, or wood, and are always signed. As with most all makers
of luxury goods, the company's sales lagged seriously during the Depression, and
over time they lost touch with the changing tastes and styles of the public to
some degree. Consequently, Pairpoint continued to experience financial
difficulties, and some buildings and equipment were sold in 1938. The company
reorganized in 1939 under the direction of Robert Gundersen and again
specialized in quality hand-blown glassware. Isaac Babbit regained possession of
the silver departments, and together they established Gundersen Glassworks, Inc.
Following the end of WWII and after a sharp decline in sales, it again became
necessary to reorganize yet again. The Gundersen-Pairpoint Glassworks was
formed, and the old line of cut, engraved artware was reintroduced. The company
moved to East Wareham, Massachusetts in 1957. Business continued to be poor, and
the firm closed early in 1958. In 1970, Robert Bryden, sales manager for the
company since the 1950s, tried to reestablish Pairpoint and new facilities were
constructed in Sagamore. In 1974, the company began to produce lead glass cup
plates which were made on commission as fund-raisers for various churches and
organizations. These are signed with a 'P' in diamond and are becoming quite
collectible.

The Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford,
MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor,
Mt. Washington Glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and
glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories
including the well known Pairpoint lamps.
The Pairpoint Merger


Duffner And Kimberly Poppy Flowered Table Lamp

4675

Here is a very nice and low priced DUFFNER and KIMBERLY poppy flowered table lamp. The base stands a whopping 29" high, has 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Is footed and bears the correct signature as shown.
The 18" shade is really a beauty with the super high quality glass and superb workmanship. None of the known Duffner were signed which is the case with this one. The shape of the shade and style of the cut in the glass is pure Duffner.

THE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY LAMP CO. STARTED IN NEW YORK, 11 WEST WEST 32ND
STREET, IN 1905 BY FRANK DUFFNER AND OLIVER KIMBERLY AND THE VERY TALENTED
DESIGNER H. T. HOWARD.
D&K COMPANIES PHILOSOPHY WAS TO OFFER LIGHTING
FIXTURES IN THE PUREST PERIOD STYLES FOR THE FINEST RESIDENCES THEY CHOSE TO
COMPETE DIRECTLY AGAINST TIFFANY STUDIOS. WHY IS SO LITTLE KNOWN ABOUT THIS FINE
CO ? D&K EXISTED FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF TIME, 1905 BUT BY 1913 WENT BANKRUPT.
THE RECESSION OF 1908 BADLY HURT SALES FOR OPULENT EXPENSIVE ITEMS. IN 1906 THE
D&K WISTERIA FLOOR LAMP COST $550 WHILE THE TIFFANY STUDIOS WISTERIA SOLD
FOR $480. NOTE, BY COMPARISON A NEW MODEL A FORD OF THAT YEAR COST $450. TODAY
D&K LAMPS ARE LIKE TIFFANY STUDIOS, HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND IN GREAT DEMAND
WHILE COMMANDING HIGH PRICES. VERY LITTLE PRINTED INFORMATION IS KNOWN TO EXIST.
THIS BASE HAS THE RARE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY METAL TAG ON THE BOTTOM


Handel 6758

4,375

Here is a very nice high end HANDEL table lamp. The shade is the biggest of the reverse painted shades 18" and is fully signed HANDEL and numbered #6758. This is one of the premium molded shades with superb artistry. Free of any damage or chips.
The base is also properly signed HANDEL has all it's original hardware with 3 HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls and stands a proud 23". Original patina. A grand piece of AMERICAN lighting art history. A great investment that will bring beauty to your home every day.

HANDEL HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in 1885 to form
the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this partnership
dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger facilities and
was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel and Company.
The Handel Company originally incorporated on June 11,
1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone Teich as the
primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his second wife,
Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company President upon Philip
Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel Turner) in
1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to William F.
Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was one of
tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Table Lamp

2,475

Here is another nice HANDEL table lamp. Stands 22" high is properly signed and has all its correct hardware. The 16" shade throws off beautiful amber / cream light.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Unique Lamp Co Table Lamp

7,975

Here for your consideration is a really outstanding RARE, RARE, "UNIQUE LAMP CO Table lamp. A superior, museum quality Unique table lamp with 18. 5" shade. Beautifully decorated with tulips in bloom. Excellent workmanship and in good original condition.
The base is also UNIQUE and is 26" high. Really nice verdigris patina. All original hardware and rewired for another near century of dependable service. A true American piece of lighting art history, and a good investment.

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Bellova Lamp

275

BELLOVA LAMP. Nice desk lamp 6" shade nicely decorated in the BELLOVA style, 12" front to back and 5" wide. Super verdigris patina.

Many collectors are familiar with Emeralite lamps, those brass-based desk and floor lamps, named for their bluish-green cased glass shades and often referred to as banker's lamps. Many others are familiar with Bellova lamps which were made in innumerable shapes, sizes and colors. Few collectors, however, realize that the glass shades and bases used in both Emeralite and Bellova lamps were actually produced in Czechoslovakia under order from a single American company, H. G. McFaddin & Co. It is not known where the metal bases where made; however, is it presumed that they were manufactured in the United States and married to the Czechoslovakian shades in New York at the McFaddin factory.


EARLY HISTORY OF THE COMPANY

Bellova and Emeralite lamps were the creation of Harrison D. McFaddin. It was in 1909 that the first Emeralite lamp, as we know it today, was produced. On May 11, 1909 McFaddin's patent application for "a new, original and ornamental design for lamp shades, " was approved. Thus began the manufacture of Emeralite and Bellova lamps that were to continue in production for fifty years.

Essentially, the Emeralites that are today most easily identifiable, collectible and with which the name Emeralite is most readily associated, were simply brass-based or brass-plated desk lamps with green-over-white cased glass shades. These desk lamp shades are substantially flat on the sides and the back and gently slope toward the viewer in the front. However, the shades have no sharp corners; rather, the angles are all essentially rounded. Using the cased glass technique, the shades were made of white opal glass on the inside with a layer of "green" or other colored glass on the outside.

As far as we know, all Emeralite shades were produced in the glass factory of J. Schreiber & Neffen, which plant was located in the city of Rapotin, Moravia, in what is now the Czech Republic. Although S&N, as they were referred to by McFaddin, produced glassware for other customers, their contract with a representative of H. G. McFaddin & Co. allowed them to produce the green cased shades only for Emeralite lamps. In turn, McFaddin was required to purchase a minimum volume of shades each year. In fact, at the height of production, fully one half of the S&N factory was devoted to the production of glass shades for H. G. McFaddin.

FOUR PERIODS OF PRODUCTION OF THE EMERALITES

The production of Emeralite desk lamps over the years can readily be divided into four distinct periods. The first period began in 1909 and lasted until 1916 and is known as the "4378 series". These shades were perforated with two holes, one at each side. It was through these holes that the shade was attached to the armature of the base and could be swiveled and then locked into the desired position.

The second period of production, known as the "8734 Series", began in 1916 and lasted until the early 1930's. The desk lamps produced during this period are those most often found and for which the name Emeralite is most readily identified. Unlike the earlier shades, the new shades were not perforated with holes. Instead, the bottom of the shades were indented on the sides and back to fit into the channel of the newly designed and patented (August 15, 1916) armature. The armature itself had clamps which needed to be maneuvered into place in order to keep the shade snug and stable. Since the shade was merely clamped into the fixture, it could be removed for cleaning or replacement without disturbing the electric wiring that was concealed, though easily accessible.

The third period of production began in the early 1930's and lasted probably less than five years. These lamps were generally part of the No. 9 series. Although the shape of the cased shades and the production techniques remained substantially the same as the two previous models, the newer shades increased in size from the older eight and one-half inch size to ten and twelve inch versions. These larger shades also required the use of two bulbs rather than just one. In addition, these shades were now clamped onto the base only at the back, almost in a clothes-pin fashion. The shade was designed with an indentation at the back to fit snugly into the clamp. Just as with the 8734 series, the shade could be removed for cleaning or replacement without disturbing the base or wiring.

The last period of the company began in the late 1930's and continued for about twenty years. The lamps produced during this period hold little or no interest for the collector of Emeralite and Bellova lamps and consequently have little intrinsic or monetary value. These lamps were, to a large extent, fluorescent and almost all were made with metal shades. The collector, therefore, is interested almost entirely in the Emeralite and Bellova lamps produced before the war.

Bases produced during the first period were usually very simple while becoming much more decorative during the second and third periods. Earlier bases were generally brass plated over a base metal if the bases were square or rectangular, and solid brass if the bases were round. Bases made during the second and third periods were usually solid brass. Most lamps had a hidden cast iron weight in the bottom of the base. Generally, bases during the second and third periods were sold with a brass finish or a statutory bronze patina, although special finishes could be furnished to order.

Throughout the four periods, there were numerous categories of lamp styles, each category with a number of varieties. Models included lamps for desks, beds, floors, adding machines, side chairs, draftsman's tables, typewriter tables and many other uses. Lamps were also available with optional removable inkwells, pen holders and pens, clocks and calendars. The inkwells, incidentally, were produced in glass by The Sengbusch Self Cleaning Inkstand Co. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin or the GEM company. The inkwells manufactured by GEM were usually marked EMERALITE on the bottom, along with the GEM name.

It is important to note that the starting and ending dates of the four periods mentioned above are only approximate. This is because H. G. McFaddin & Co. continued to manufacture shades and bases for previous periods for many years after they introduced the new lines. Hence, in 1940 for example, one could purchase a replacement shade for the 4378, 8734 or No. 9 lamps. Some of my catalogs from the late 1930's for example, show both the 8734 and No. 9 line lamps as well as replacement shades for the 4378 lamps, which line was officially discontinued in 1916.


BELLOVA LAMPS

H. G. McFaddin & Co. introduced its Bellova line in February 1923. Unlike most of the shades produced for the Emeralite lines, which were smooth green cased glass, Bellova shades were manufactured in other colors, as well as green, or with an acid-etched texture, or painted with an air-brush or reverse painted by hand.

What many collectors of Czech glass do not realize, is that a number of the Bellova shades found today were produced in the standard Emeralite desk lamp shape and, in fact, will fit the Emeralite 8734 or No. 9 desk lamp bases. It has even been known to find the identical acid-etched, reverse-painted desk lamp shade signed Emeralite in one instance and Bellova in another, although the latter is more likely to be the case with these fancier desk lamp shades. Nevertheless, Bellova desk lamps are often found in colors other than just the green that we associate with Emeralites. These colors include russet brown, Rhodolite (marbleized and opaque), chamois and rose. Frequently, these desk lamps have a one-inch reverse painted boarder along the bottom of the shade that reflects a floral or geometric design. It is not uncommon to find these desk lamp shades on fancier bases than the usual Emeralite desk lamps. These bases were sometimes designed and painted to complement the shade.

Next to the desk lamps, the Bellova lamps that are most familiar to collectors of Czech glass are those that were made in two parts, entirely of glass and advertised by the company as Gnome lamps. These lamps usually had a glass ball-shaped or cylindrical bottom with a mushroom or "Coolie-hat" type glass top. Sometimes the top portion of the lamp was cylindrical as well, yet squatter, like the shape of very thick hockey puck.

Gnome lamps generally came in three sizes. The largest, which were about 15" tall and 14" at their widest point (the Coolie-hat shade), were referred to just as Gnome lamps in the catalogs. The middle size, about 9" tall were referred to as Miniature Gnomes, while the smallest, at about 4" high, were called Petit Gnomes. Gnome lamps are ususally obverse-painted using air-brushing, sometimes acid etched, rarely reverse-painted and very occasionally done in a cameo cut technique similar to Galle. The colors, etching patterns and designs were numerous. However, most fall into the category of either floral or "geometric Deco". Some Gnome lamps depicted children or animals playing or oriental figures which were applied using "transfers" rather than being hand painted. Still other Gnomes had glass-applied handles on either side of the bottom part of the lamp, although this is unusual.
In addition to the desk and Gnome lamps, H. G. McFaddin & Co. produced an extensive line of Bellova lamps that were made exclusively for unique Bellova metal bases referred to by collectors as boudoir and table lamps. These lamps were generally smaller in size, although some larger table lamps have been found. In addition, a limited number of chandeliers, sconces, tube, and floor lamps were produced.
The tube lamps were usually tall and round, similar in shape to the cardboard inner lining of a paper towel roll. The panel lamps were rectangular in shape, flat on all six sides and taller than they were wide. Both the tube and panel lamps were usually cameo cut, although sometimes found as acid etched. Patterns ranged from delicate pastel florals to, believe it or not, a stagecoach with horses. All tube and panel lamps came on a flat or stepped black shiny glass base, either round for the tube lamps or rectangular for the panel lamps. The number and variety of Bellova lamps appears endless. Even an experienced collector regularly uncovers Bellova styles, colors or patterns which may never have been seen before.


OTHER LINES
Glow Night Lamp
Thermolite


In addition to Emeralite and Bellova lamps, H. G. McFaddin & Co. produced a line of heat lamps, called Thermolite, to be used for medicinal purposes and a line of industrial lamps called Mefcolite. Also, at some time during McFaddin's history, they purchased a company which produced a line of miniature oil lamps called Glow Night Lamps. None of these three lines holds any particular interest for Emeralite and Bellova collectors.


SIGNATURES

Almost without exception, all Emeralite and Bellova shades were signed. Emeralite shades were either signed with a silver ink stamp, a rectangular decal about two inches wide and one-half inch high or a round decal.

Bellova shades were always signed, as well. The Bellova signature was almost always an ink stamp although a round decal is very occasionally found. The ink stamp is about the size of a dime, usually silver, although red, white and other colors were also used. The signature consisted of what appeared to be a four petaled flower in the center of two concentric circles. On the outside top edge of the circles is the word BELLOVA and on the outside bottom edge of the circles is the word CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Bellova desk lamps were usually signed on the inside front or back of the shade, near the bottom rim. However, many Bellova lamps have been signed in any number of other places. For example, if the shade is reverse-painted with a floral pattern, the signature is usually found in the middle of one of the flowers and is often hard to see. Otherwise, the signature is generally found around the top outside rim of the shade for the boudoir and table lamps and on the underside of the top and bottom halves of the Gnome lamps. Bellova tube and panel lamps are usually signed near the bottom outside rim of the top half. The bottom half of the tube and panel lamps, which as described above is generally black glass, is usually signed on the bottom with a silver ink stamp with the word ALBINOR. Albinor is the trademarked name that H. G. McFaddin & Co. used on these black glass bases for the Bellova lamps.

It should be noted that the methods for signing the lamps described above are the methods usually found. However, lamps have been discovered with genuine signatures in other less likely places.

LATER HISTORY

Around 1939, H. G. McFaddin & Co. was purchased by one of its employees, Charles Inness Brown, when H. D. McFaddin chose to retire. Upon the company's sale, the name of the firm was changed from H. G. McFaddin & Co. , Inc. to The Emeralite Co. , Inc. After the takeover, the direction of the corporation changed, as described above, from the collectable Emeralite and Bellova lamps to contemporary models which, though modern, are today far from memorable.

Emeralite Inc. started to become unprofitable in the late 1950's. When Inness-Brown died in 1960, the business was sold again, at which time the company's name was changed from The Emeralite Co. , Inc. to Tilarem, Inc. . Note that Tilarem is Emeralite spelled backwards after dropping the first and last "e" in Emeralite. In 1962 Tilarem was legally dissolved. Thus ended the Emeralite and Bellova story.


Unique Floor Lamp

15,850

Here for your consideration is a once in a lifetime opportunity to buy a very rare and beautiful floor lamp. 100% complete and original "UNIQUE LAMP CO. FLOOR LAMP" Just amazing!!! All-over apple blossom. Have never had one as nice as this. 26". . . . yes that's 26" diameter shade. 69" tall. Has the correct 6 socket cluster with Bryant sockets and acorn chain pulls. Solid bronze and very heavy. This Museum quality lamp really performs and is the conversation piece in any room. A super piece of AMERICAN lighting art history, and a very good investment that will bring joy to one's home every day. $15, 850. 00. In fairness, it should be noted that during the antique hey day of a nearly a decade ago, this lamp sold for double. Now all are on their way back the economic scale.

UNIQUE LAMP COMPANY HISTORY

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. The UNIQUE lamp Co. went into direct competition with TIFFANY with superb glass and workmanship. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Chicago Mosaic

1,495

CHICAGO MOSAIC Cobb Web and flowered

I have for sale this leaded slag glass lamp made by the Chicago Mosiac lamp company. its a pretty cool lamp and one i have not seen before. the base measures 24 inches tall and the shade is 18 inches wide so its a full sized lamp for sure. the base in original wonderful patina from top to bottom. its been recently rewired. the shade with a different sort of coloration and really performs well. There are some very minor hairline cracks in a few of the slag pieces but are super tight and certainly not going anywhere (please see photos). This lamp and its in very good orignal condition. the base also has the green felt on the bottom.

CHICAGO MOSAIC HISTORY

The Mosaic Lamp Co. of Chicago, c. 1910s.
"Chicago Mosaic" was one of the finest makers of stained glass lamps, and are
highly collectible.

The Mosaic Shade Company of Chicago, Ill. Today these lamps are known by
dealers and collectors as Chicago Mosaic


Gustav Stickley Lamp #262

2,875

Here is a really rare GUSTAV STICKLEY LAMP #262. All you arts and crafts folks, listen up, this is for you. Wonderful hammered copper with great old Aurora brown patina. Fas 3 early 2 screw HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Has been rewired. This GUS lamp is documented on page 153, of the GUSTAV STICKLEY BOOK as shown. The base stands 27" high with a 16. 5" wicker shade. Liner in the shade is a little loose.

Gustav Stickley was born March 9, 1858 in Osceola, Wisconsin and
died April 21, 1942 in Syracuse, New York.
First trained as a stone mason, Stickley preferred to work in wood and and hammered copper
dreamed of building fine tables and chairs. He learned furniture making at his
uncle's chair factory in Lanesboro, Pennsylvania. Traveling to Europe in 1896,
he met notable Arts and Crafts designers. The following year he returned to the
United States and founded the United Crafts of Eastwood, New York. In 1904, he
founded the Craftsman Workshops. The furniture he designed and made was mostly
of native American oak. It was of a sturdy-plain design in contrast to the
highly decorated late Victorian pieces. Joinery was exposed and upholstery was
carried out in canvas and leather (natural materials). It became known as
Mission Style. Stickley's designs were exhibited at the prestigious Grand Rapids
and Pan American furniture expositions.


Handel #2704

2,875

Here is a chandelier made and properly signed HANDEL. Totally arts and crafts, like it came from a FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT home. the three 7" shade are properly signed HANDEL CO. #2704 and artist B whom is BAILEY, ONE OF Phillip J. Handel's best designers and artists. Solid brass. Ceiling pan, all six hooks and each shade signed HANDEL. Rare and in excellent condition with PASTE sockets with acorn chain pulls. Hangs 27" and rewired for safety. Reduced from $3550 to $2875 for quick sale.

HANDEL LAMP COMPANY HISTORY

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Leaded Glass Lamp Shade

1,675

Here is a very hard to find super designed high quality antique leaded glass lamp shade featuring art nouveau design. Has that hard to build bulbous outer diameter with deep bend in the heavily textured "cats paw" glass. This lamp was difficult to build and spent a lot of time in the kiln to slump the many pieces of glass that throws off well coordinated colors. This heavy textured glass catches the lite and really performs nicely. is in very good condition overall, with only two tight cracks and no repairs.

This shade can be used as either a hanger, or would work on either a floor or table base.

The shade has a diameter of 18'' wide and is 12'' high.

The fitter 'comes with hanger fitting"opening is 2''


Owl Lamp

3,995

Here is a super cool and seldom seen J. A. WHALEY leaded OWL lamp. these high end Whaley lamps are rare lamps especially this one which is the stylized OWL. One can see examples of these by going to leadedlamps. com. that said, this is a super super lamp and in excellent original condition. this is a large lamp with the base measuring 26 inches tall, and the shade 20 inches wide. the base in very nice original patina with all three good old sockets matching and in fine working order. its been recently rewired with period style cloth cord and there is no cracks or metal fatigue to be found. the only thing I could see related to a repair is, it looks like years ago the threaded support rod that holds the finial down came loose and somebody leaded it back in. it cant be seen when the shade and base are together so its really a minor sort of repair and I mention it simply for accuracy sake for the super picky. as for the shade that's also in great original condition. no broken or cracked pieces, and in great well coordinated colors, and suburb workmanship. As you can see this lamp lights up very very nicely and will look like a million bucks when set on a stickley or limbert table. this is a pretty interesting lamp folks and it stands out amongst the other more common makes. a Whaley lamp base and or shade stands alone when it comes to appearance, yet the quality is on par with Handel. Nice piece of AMERICAN LAMP/ART HISYORY

The modern West generally associates owls with wisdom. This link goes back at least as far as Ancient Greece, where Athens, noted for art and scholarship, and Athena, Athens' patron goddess and the goddess of wisdom, had the owl as a symbol. [39] Marija Gimbutas traces veneration of the owl as a goddess, among other birds, to the culture of Old Europe, long pre-dating Indo-European cultures. [40

WHALEY HISTORY

JOHN A WHALEY STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS ON 23RD ST. NEW YORK 1898. WHALEY'S
COPPER FOILED SHADES AND BRONZE BASES WERE HIGH QUALITY THAT RIVELED
TIFFANY. THE WHALEY HIGH QUALITY LAMPS SOLD BRISKLY THRU THE EARLY 1900'S


Handel Greek Key

2,450

Here is a all original, excellent properly signed HANDEL GREEK KEY HANGER. The shade measures 11" point to point and has that very well coordinated glass. The border has that lite green with the body of striated amber glass with the rare brick work overlay. Has the HANDEL metal tag. All original hardware, just as it was built a century ago. Has the correct socket with acorn chain pull A magnificent piece of AMERICAN art / lighting history.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.

greek key meander

The meander motif took its name from the river Meander, a river with many twists, mentioned by Homer in Iliad. The motif is also known as Greek key or Greek fret.

Meander was the most important symbol in Ancient Greece, symbolizing infinity or the eternal flow of things. Many temples and objects were decorated with this motif, and it is considered that there is a connection with the Cretan labyrinth - indeed - a labyrinth can be drawn using a Greek key.

Meander symbolizes as well the bonds of friendship, of love and devotion, well being of health and that's the reason it's often given as marriage gift. It can symbolize as well the four cardinal points, the 4 seasons, waves - especially in the round version of it, or snakes, among others.


Handel Lantern

1,650

Here for your consideration is a very nice and completely all original HANDEL hanging "hangs 26" lantern lamp. Has the 6"x9" lamp body which has that great original amber glass which throws off the coppery, romantic lite. Has the heavy bronze chain and ceiling canopy. This lamp is shown in the HANDEL books as a hanger and a table lamp with one or two shades. Is complete, even has the original acorn chain pull.
The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Landscape

895

Here for your consideration is a nice HANDEL boudoir desk/dresser lamp. The base measures 16: tall and has the woven tree style base, shows some wear from it's century of life. Has the HANDEL signature with good old socket and acorn chain pull. The 9: woodland, landscape reverse painting has nice coloration with superb detail and is signed by Magnell a contemporary artist known as a fine artist in her own right. A real bargain at $895, when other boudoirs bring over twice that much.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Wicker Table Lamp

295

Please see this supercool signed wicker table lamp. this is a period 1920-1935 wicker lamp made by Lloyd Loom Products out of Menominee Michigan Its original red painted borders are still good. . the three support arms still strong and showing no signs of weakness, the cord probably replaced same with the socket but those are very minor details for sure. A true piece of period American lighting/ art history.


Pittsburgh Molded Glass Table Lamp

650

He is a nice PITTSBURGH molded glass table lamp. The shade has expert hand painted artistry. The landscape has nice vertical trees with real depth almost like 3D. Is the chipped ice with the Cat's paw end areas which was done cleverly to cause the lamp to really pop. Low priced at $650.

THE PITTSBURGH " PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, A
CHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFUL
LAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THE
UPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TO
THE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Handel Twisted Tree Lamp Base

1,275

SUPER RARE HANDEL TWISTED TREE LAMP BASE

This is a really RARE Handel lamp base. It is in the form of a twisted tree trunk. I have only ever seen this base come up once or twice for sale. Now you have your chance to own one. The base is complete with its original cap and finial, has Hubbell sockets and acorns, and is wired up with period style cloth braided cord. It stands 22 1/2" tall and the bottom is 7 1/2" in diameter and is properly signed HANDEL. . The base has its original copper "penny" style finish which is in very nice shape overall (a few dark areas here and there, a couple of flakes of on the bottom, no dents or major scratches). All you need is a shade, and this base will add a lot of value to it due to its rarity. I am offering this great looking, complete, RARE, $1275

THE GREAT HANDEL CO. HISTORY

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

2,350

Here for your consideration is a very nice arts and crafts table lamp by the WILKINSON LAMP CO. Has the heavy chunk glass at the border which I have tried to show the protrusion. Has the 18" shade in very good condition, patina is nice with only 2 tight heat lines.
The base is 24" high with great patina, all original hardware and rewired for another century of beautiful and dependable service. Properly signed WILKINSON BROOKLYNE NY.

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN
1909 AT 45 YORK ST. BROOKLYN, NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE
TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE
BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS. THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS
OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO. INTO
BANKRUPTCY IN 1915


Pair Antique Handel Bird Woodland Art Glass Lamp Globe Hanging Chandeliers

3400 ea

Pair Antique Classic Original Unsigned Handel Bird Woodland Art Glass Lamp Globe Hanging Hard Wired Chandelier 9 inch Diameter each. The painting is attributed to Handel master decorator, Henri Bedigie, featuring woodland scenic compositions with birds in flight. The glass is textured; called cracked ice which was a patten held by the HANDEL LAMP CO. This pair and came from the same fabulous estate as the 50 piece collection of Royal Worcester. The family shopped at M. S. Ran Antiques in New Orleans, Louisiana, the Manhattan Art and Antique Center of Second Avenue in Manhattan and at major South Florida antique fairs. Pre-sale estimate is $4000-6000 each. Please take a moment to enlarge and view all the detailed pictures. One of the HANDEL globes has a black spot which looks like paint splatter. One globe has a very slight scratch, mentioned for accuracy. Before shipping, both lamps will be properly rewired with the correct wire with drop of chain adjusted in length "longer or shorter to suit the application of the buyer. The slight wear around the aperture is common and is covered by the brass "all original " hardware. $3400 each

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Hampshire

5,975

Here for your consideration is a very nice HANDEL table lamp with it's original HAMPSHIRE lamp base. The 18" HANDEL shade is the pine slope in magnificent all original glass with the "S" border. Finely coordinated strong colors that perform well. The shade ring is signed as is the inside with the traditional HANDEL brass tag.

The lamp base is the HAMPSHIRE, made as a lamp base "not driller" was always a lamp base made by HAMPSHIRE for this application for HANDEL. Is properly sighed and has the 10" marking as shown. Is 10" wide at the bulbous and the actual matt green base is 10" high with the total height of 21 1/2". Has the three Hubbell sockets, acorn chain pulls and the tee pee shade support. All the hardware is HANDEL.

HANDEL LAMP COMPANY HISTORY

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand
About Hampshire Pottery

Hampshire Pottery InformationHampshire Pottery began production in 1871. The pottery was founded by James Taft. Hampshire Pottery first introduced the widely popular matte green glaze in 1883. In 1904 Cadmon Robertson joined Hampshire Pottery and was soon placed in charge of production. Robertson developed over 900 glazes while with Hampshire Pottery and was responsible for many of the forms.

Robertson passed away in 1914 which left Hampshire solely in the hands of Taft. Just after Robertson's death, Taft determined to cease production. In 1916 Taft sold Hampshire Pottery to George Morton who was previously with Grueby Pottery.

Hampshire pottery continued for only a year under Morton's direction and was closed in 1917. After the end of World War I, Morton reopened Hampshire Pottery with primary production being white china for hotels and restaurants. Hampshire Pottery closed permanently in 1923.


Handel Table Lamp (damaged)

1,850

Here for your consideration is a HANDEL table lamp with damage. Known as the 8 panel leaf and vine. Shade is properly signed twice as shown and measures flat to flat 16" has 2 broken panels. All the filigree is good, no damage.
The base is also properly signed HANDEL as shown. Has all it's original working hardware with 3 HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls. Greatly reduced because of the damage.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Bronzed Table Lamp

275

Here is a nice bronzed table lamp with jeweled shade. Stands 12" high x 5. 5". Probably Bavarian. Has the radial hammered copper shade and nice original patina.


Pairpoint 18 x 22

1,475

Here for your consideration is a nice and properly signed PAIRPOINT with the rare dolphin lamp base. The 18" shade is obverse and reverse painter to provide the 3 diametrical look, common with Pairpoint. Has trees, water, mountains and birds in flight and free of chips or cracks. The base is the dolphin with all original hardware, acorn chain pulls and rewired for another century of dependable and beautiful service.
Priced low to sell at $1475.

PAIRPOINT HISTORY

"Be it known that I, ALBERT STEFFIN, a citizen of the United
States, residing at New Bedford. in the county of Bristol and State of
Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful improvements in the
Manufacture of Glass Shades and Screens, of which the following is a
specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawing. The object of my
invention is to provide articles of different forms for different purposes, such
as shades for covering lamps and screens for admitting light which articles are
mad up of numerous pieces of molded glass, each piece of glass being shaped with
irregular raised surface, and the entire article being a harmonious combination
of the various molded pieces. . . "


Background and History
Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880
in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first
made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington
Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring
synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s,
lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production.
There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy -
blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse
painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually
executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally).
Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic
shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower
inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp. , 2) Patent Pending, 3)
Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were
frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted
effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse
painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a
perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.

Bases were made of bronze,
copper, brass, silver, or wood, and are always signed. As with most all makers
of luxury goods, the company's sales lagged seriously during the Depression, and
over time they lost touch with the changing tastes and styles of the public to
some degree. Consequently, Pairpoint continued to experience financial
difficulties, and some buildings and equipment were sold in 1938. The company
reorganized in 1939 under the direction of Robert Gundersen and again
specialized in quality hand-blown glassware. Isaac Babbit regained possession of
the silver departments, and together they established Gundersen Glassworks, Inc.
Following the end of WWII and after a sharp decline in sales, it again became
necessary to reorganize yet again. The Gundersen-Pairpoint Glassworks was
formed, and the old line of cut, engraved artware was reintroduced. The company
moved to East Wareham, Massachusetts in 1957. Business continued to be poor, and
the firm closed early in 1958. In 1970, Robert Bryden, sales manager for the
company since the 1950s, tried to reestablish Pairpoint and new facilities were
constructed in Sagamore. In 1974, the company began to produce lead glass cup
plates which were made on commission as fund-raisers for various churches and
organizations. These are signed with a 'P' in diamond and are becoming quite
collectible.

The Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford,
MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor,
Mt. Washington Glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and
glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories
including the well known Pairpoint lamps.


Steuben-tiffany Lamp

7,500

Here for your consideration is a TIFFANY floor lamp with a very rare STEUBEN glass shade. The 10" STEUBEN shade is in excellent original condition and still has a remnant of the STEUBEN signature inside the aperture. The STEUBEN book describes, shape # 761 brown with applied ornament with intarsia border.

The base stands 53" high, is properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YOUR # 423. Has all it's original hardware, good patina and rewired. This beautiful lamp is $7500.

Would sell the shade alone for $3250.

Steuben Glass Works was an American art glass manufacturer, founded in the summer of 1903 by Fredrick C. Carder and Thomas G. Hawkes in Corning, New York, which is in Steuben County, from which the company name was derived. Hawkes was the owner of the largest cut glass firm then operating in Corning. Carder was an Englishman (born 18 September 1863) who had many years' experience designing glass for Stevens and Williams inEngland. Hawkes purchased the glass blanks for his cutting shop from many sources and eventually wanted to start a factory to make the blanks himself. Hawkes convinced Carder to come to Corning and manage such a factory. Carder, who had been passed over for promotion at Stevens and Williams, consented to do so.

In July 2008, Steuben was sold by Corning Incorporated for an undisclosed price to the Schottenstein Stores Corp. , [1] which also owns 51% of Retail Ventures, a holding company for DSW, Filene's Basement, and formerly Value City Department Stores; Value City Furniture, which changed its name to American Signature Furniture; 15% of American Eagle Outfitters, retail liquidator SB Capital Group, some 50 shopping centers, and 5 factories producing its shoes, furniture and crystal.

On September 15, 2011, Schottenstein announced it was shutting down Steuben's Corning factory and Manhattan store, ending the company's 108-year history. [2]

In early 2014, The Corning Museum of Glass announced the re-introduction of Stueben in a new, lead-free formula. [3] A limited assortment of iconic designs will be available at the Museum Store and online. [4

LOUIS COMFORT BORN 1848 TO CHARLES LEWIS TIFFANY. HE GREW UP IN HIS FATHERS
JEWLERY BUSINESS. Tiffany founded his own firm in 1885 and focused on art
glass. Earlier, Louis had already registered for a patent on a new glassmaking
technique of combining different colors in opalescent glass to create vibrant,
multidimensional hues of color never before seen in glass. This challenged the
traditional approach of painting on glass to create multicolored effects.
Tiffany became an enthusiastic supporter of the European Art Nouveau movement,
challenging the current Victorian ornate style. Art Nouveau used free-flowing
designs based on nature that exemplified the characteristics prevalent in
Tiffanys earlier creations as a landscape painter. The use of light, color and
nature assumed greater significance in Tiffanys work as he developed his unique
approach to Art Nouveau. Tiffany's work was displayed in Europe at the most
important venue for the introduction of Art Nouveau, Siegfried Bing's L'Art
Nouveau.
In an effort to reach the interiors of a greater population, Tiffany
began to design lamps to allow more people to enjoy art and beauty in their own
home. Colored glass, Tiffanys lasting love and challenge, found fresh scope and
inspiration. While the windows served to transmit the light of day, the lamps
represent a new source of illumination independent of daylight. Fabrication of
the lamps began in 1885, with the majority of them being made between 1895 and
1920. It was not until 1899 that Tiffany publicly introduced the lamps for
sale.
Tiffany is best known for his designs of glass vessels, lamps and
windows, but he also created items in various other media including metalwork,
furniture, jewelry and ceramics, introducing enamels in 1898, art pottery in
1900, and jewelry in 1904. He established a metalwork department, producing
lamps, desk sets, and chandeliers that were sold through his New York showroom,
company catalogues and department stores. He designed most anything having to do
with interior design, including even textiles and wall coverings. His remarkable
career spanned over five decades, including his tenure with L. C. Tiffany &
Associated Artists, the Tiffany Glass Company, Tiffany Studios, Tiffany Furnaces
and the L. C. Tiffany Furnaces.
By Tiffanys death on February 18, 1933, the
popularity of his elaborate lamps declined with the rise of Art Moderne and
Expressionism. For two decades the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany were
forgotten. It was not until the first Tiffany retrospective show in 1958 that
his objects were rediscovered by museums and collectors. Awareness of Tiffanys
craftsmanship escalated with an Art Nouveau show in 1960 at the Museum of Modern
Art. Today the designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany are honored and treasured around
the world, confirming Tiffanys legacy as a visionary of Art Nouveau design AND
MOST ANYTHING WITH THE MAGICAL TIFFANY NAME FETCHES ENORMOUS SUMS OF MONEY


Gorham Lamp

1,175

Here is a GORHAM LAMP. THE 11" SHADE IS REALLY OUTSTANDING WITH BRICK WORK GLASS IN VERY NICE WELL COORDINADED COLORS. Stands 18" high with two modern working pull chain sockets.

The Gorham Mfg. Co. stands out as the only firm to
outdo Tiffany in the ostentation of their work. Perhaps because they were
already accomplished in bronze and silver work, they added a leaded shade studio
in 1905. This impressive colonial model is one of their most elaborate
creations. The shade is made up of over 3000 individual pieces of glass, far
surpassing anything Tiffany attempted at a comparable scale.


Handel Shades

1,275

Here is a nice pair of HANDEL shades, in excellent original condition. Both properly signed HANDEL and measure 6" x 5" and are the typical 2 1/4" fitter $1275 for the pair.


Suess Hanging Lamp

3,850

Here is a really nice SUESS hanging lamp. Has hundreds of high quality glass with superb workmanship. Measures 15. 5" high and 15" at the wide place. Has a 3 lite cluster with 3 heavy hanging hooks. No chain or ceiling canopy. This lamp has very high value however am selling low at $3850.


Gorham Lamp

1,675

Here is a nice Gorham lamp. Measures 14" shade x 19" high. All nice and correct.


Bigelow And Kinnard Lamp Shade

2,875

Here is a super nice BIGELOW and KINNARD lamp shade. great design, strong colors and superb workmanship. Shade only, marked down from $3650 to $2875.

THE BIGELOW AND KENNARD &CO BOSTON, MASS. 1863-1922. HOMER
L. BIGELOW, THE HEAD AND GUIDING SPIRIT OF THE STUDIOS SINCE ITS INCEPTION
. IN THE EARLY YEARS THE CO. MANUFACTURED AND SOLD A WIDE ARRAY OF SILVERWARE
PRODUCTS. IN 1900, THEY STARTED TO MAKE HIGH QUALITY LAMPS. AROUND 1908,
CONSUMER SPENDING SLOWED WITH LAMP MAKING STOPPED IN 1910. THE ONLY KNOW
DOCUMENTATION IS THE 1909 NEW ENGLAND MAGAZINE ARTICLE. MANY OF THE FINE LAMPS
ARE IN EXISTENCE AND FETCH HIGH MONEY.


Unique Lamp

1,875

Here is a really nice high performing UNIQUE LAMP CO. Lamp. Has the flowered poppy design and really pops. 17" shade x 24" high. Ready to go and low priced at $1875.

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Duffner And Kimberly Lamp

2,275

Here is a nice DUFFNER and KIMBERLY lamp. Nice colors and shade measures 18" and has 2 heat lines. The base stands 21. 5" high and has those good old rare working early HUBBELL SOCKETS with the mica insulator with acorn chain pulls. A really nice and performing lamp.

THE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY LAMP CO. STARTED IN NEW YORK, 11 WEST WEST 32ND
STREET, IN 1905 BY FRANK DUFFNER AND OLIVER KIMBERLY AND THE VERY TALENTED
DESIGNER H. T. HOWARD.
D&K COMPANIES PHILOSOPHY WAS TO OFFER LIGHTING
FIXTURES IN THE PUREST PERIOD STYLES FOR THE FINEST RESIDENCES THEY CHOSE TO
COMPETE DIRECTLY AGAINST TIFFANY STUDIOS. WHY IS SO LITTLE KNOWN ABOUT THIS FINE
CO ? D&K EXISTED FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF TIME, 1905 BUT BY 1913 WENT BANKRUPT.
THE RECESSION OF 1908 BADLY HURT SALES FOR OPULENT EXPENSIVE ITEMS. IN 1906 THE
D&K WISTERIA FLOOR LAMP COST $550 WHILE THE TIFFANY STUDIOS WISTERIA SOLD
FOR $480. NOTE, BY COMPARISON A NEW MODEL A FORD OF THAT YEAR COST $450. TODAY
D&K LAMPS ARE LIKE TIFFANY STUDIOS, HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND IN GREAT DEMAND
WHILE COMMANDING HIGH PRICES.


Birds In Flight

7,675

Here is one of those super rare HANDEL'S birds in flight. Has the HANDEL coralene treatment where molten glass is colored and sprayed onto the surface. Really causes the depth and performance. Shade ring is signed as is the inside of the shade HANDEL 6057. Free of any damage whatsoever.
The HANDEL base is also rare, properly signed with all original working hardware. HUBBELL sockets, acorn chain pulls, this lamp has it all. A real piece of American art/lamp history.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


American Shade

425

Here is a nice American shade. Measures 18. 5" and has 24 segments, all in excellent original condition. The border is done in scrolled bronze and is beautiful. Has the cat's paw convoluted glass for performance. Selling low at $425.


Newcome Village Lamp Shade

350

Here for your consideration is a pair of NEWCOME VILLAGE LAMP shade. Pierced copper and nice. Measure 6-8" and 3. 5 " high.


Tiffany Lamp

13,500

Here is a very nice and all original TIFFANY lamp in excellent condition properly signed, shade and base. I have tried to capture the true beauty of the glass in the 16" shade. The 22. 5" has it's original gold doer patina with correct and original hardware. This TIFFANY lamp is found on page #95 with number #257 in the book TIFFANY AT AUCTION, by Duncan. Properly rewired for another centure of dependable service. Low price for this historic piece of American lamp / art history.


Gorham Lamp

875

Here is a nice GORHAM table lamp. Good condition and very low price.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

1,750

Here is a nice and properly signed WILKINSON table lamp. The 18" shade has great high quality glass with strong colors. The base measures 25. 5" high and has the really nice old HUBBELL 2 screw sockets with acorn chain pulls. This lamp base has a replacement, repro heat cap. Selling low for $1750.

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN
1909 AT 45 YORK ST. BROOKLYN, NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE
TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE
BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS. THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS
OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO. INTO
BANKRUPTCY IN 1915.


Pittsburgh Table Lamp

895

Here is a nice and properly signed PITTSBURGH table lamp. Shade and base are original to each other and free of any damage or repairs. The shade measures 16" x 21" high. Throws off that beautiful lite. The process is acid etching to imbed the design. is case glass inside to distribute the lite evenly and to avoid bulb spot glare. The weight inside the foot is commonly signed "PILABRASCO". The small 1" cap which is under the shade is missing as shown. $895, very low price.

THE PITTSBURGH " PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, A
CHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFUL
LAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THE
UPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TO
THE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Williamson Hanging Lamp

1,375

Here is a very nice WILLIAMSON hanging lamp. Massive, measures 33" corner to corner and 23" flat to flat.
Hangs 45" and has all it's original hardware. please see the heavy solid brass loops and chain. Lite 5 bulb cluster is also awesome. Nice arts and crafts design with acorn chain pulls. The WILLIAMSON LAMP CO. specialized in mission, arts and crafts lamps, while using the best glass and workmanship. Also their bronze hardware was the best of the best. One tight heat line which is hard to photograph. $1375, low price

THE R. WILLIAMSON CO. WAS STARTED IN THE LATE 1890'S ON WASHINGTON &
JEFFERSON STREETS IN CHICAGO, ILLS. MAKING ALL SORTS OF ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES, BRASS AND
IRON FITTINGS AND SPECIALIZING IN LAMPS


Pittsburgh Table Lamp

595

Here is a nice and all original PITTSBURGH table lamp. All is the way it was built nearly a century ago.
Measures 21" high with a 17" shade with poppies and foilage. The glass is convoluted for lite catching and performance in the base for stability. This is a very well built lamp, clean lines and good thought in structure and mechanical. . Pittsburgh commonly signed on top of the cast iron weight in the foot, I suspect the same here with this lamp. One of the arms show some stress but not weakened of effecting the lamp in anyway. So slight, my digital camera could not capture. Low low price $595


Steuben Trumpet Lamp

695

Here is a very nice STEUBEN trumpet lamp. Hangs 21 " with a 14" ceiling pan. All brass The shades are all signed STEUBEN and have that beautiful iridescence and throw off the beautiful coppery lite. Just for clarity, 2 of the shades have a very small flea bite on top of the fitter which is hidden by the fitter. Shades are 6" with the typical 2 1/4" fitter. Nice original patina $695 low price to sell

Steuben Glass Works was an American art glass manufacturer, founded in the summer of 1903 by Fredrick C. Carder and Thomas G. Hawkes in Corning, New York, which is in Steuben County, from which the company name was derived. Hawkes was the owner of the largest cut glass firm then operating in Corning. Carder was an Englishman (born 18 September 1863) who had many years' experience designing glass for Stevens and Williams inEngland. Hawkes purchased the glass blanks for his cutting shop from many sources and eventually wanted to start a factory to make the blanks himself. Hawkes convinced Carder to come to Corning and manage such a factory. Carder, who had been passed over for promotion at Stevens and Williams, consented to do so.

In July 2008, Steuben was sold by Corning Incorporated for an undisclosed price to the Schottenstein Stores Corp. , [1] which also owns 51% of Retail Ventures, a holding company for DSW, Filene's Basement, and formerly Value City Department Stores; Value City Furniture, which changed its name to American Signature Furniture; 15% of American Eagle Outfitters, retail liquidator SB Capital Group, some 50 shopping centers, and 5 factories producing its shoes, furniture and crystal.

On September 15, 2011, Schottenstein announced it was shutting down Steuben's Corning factory and Manhattan store, ending the company's 108-year history. [2]

In early 2014, The Corning Museum of Glass announced the re-introduction of Stueben in a new, lead-free formula. [3] A limited assortment of iconic designs will be available at the Museum Store and online


Gorham Floor Lamp Base

7,500

Here is a really rare and outstanding, EXCEPTIONAL, MUSEUM GRADE GORHAM floor lamp base. ARGUABLY ONE OF THE BEST EXAMPLES OF A TRULY SPECIAL LAMP BASE YOU WILL EVER COME ACROSS. Solid bronze with original patina which shows the bronze peeking thru, just beautiful, which I have tried to capture with my digital camera, but fell far short I fear. Is a whopping 71" high and a generous 16" spread at the lions feet for stability. Is a machinist dream, unscrews to 6 sections. has the original three early 2 screw HUBBELL sockets with mica insulators and acorn chain pulls. The shade aperture size of the GORMAN lamps is 1 3/4" as it is here. Look at the amazing detail in the bronze feet and elsewhere. The acanthus leaves appear thru out this magnificent piece of American art history. The GORHAM Mgf. Co. was the only firm to out do TIFFANY, this one of those pieces that earned the high reputation that GORHAM enjoyed. Has been correctly rewired for another over century of dependable service. No one, but no one has a great lamp base like this, even the advanced collectors. Low, low bargain price.

The Gorham Mfg. Co. stands out as the only firm to
outdo Tiffany in the ostentation of their work. Perhaps because they were
already accomplished in bronze and silver work, they added a leaded shade studio
in 1905.

Gorham Silver was founded in Providence, Rhode Island, 1831 by Jabez Gorham, [3] a master craftsman, in partnership with Henry L. Webster. [4] The firm's chief product was spoons of coin silver. The company also made thimbles, combs, jewelry, and other small items. In 1842, the Congress enacted a tariff which effectively blocked the importation of silverware from outside the United States, which aided the American silver industry. Jabez Gorham did not take full advantage of this opportunity, but in 1847 Jabez retired and his son, John Gorham[5] succeeded him as head of the company. John Gorham introduced mechanized production methods, enlarged the premises in downtown Providence, improved the designs, and expanded the product line. In 1852, Gorham toured many of Europe's silver workshops and manufacturers, speaking with individual specialists, including master craftsmen and toolmakers. He sought highly skilled foreign workmen to train his American workers and hired George Wilkinson, a premier designer and workshop manager, from England. In 1865, the Rhode Island legislature granted a charter in the name of Gorham Manufacturing Company and in 1890, the company relocated to a factory on Adelaide Avenue in Providence.

During the heyday of American silver manufacturing, approximately 1850 - 1940, Gorham was highly influential. William C. Codman, one of Gorham's most noted designers, created theChantilly design in 1895, which has become the most famous of Gorham's flatware patterns. The company has produced matching holloware in both sterling and silverplate.

In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architectStanford White. In 1906, Gorham purchased another long-time rival, New Jersey-based Kerr & Co.

Textron purchased the company in 1967, a move that some critics claim decreased quality due to management's lack of understanding of Gorham's specialty, producing high-quality sterling silverware and holloware. [6] Textron sold the unit in 1988. [7] Brown-Forman Corporation owned Gorham from 1991 until 2005 when it sold the unit to Department 56 in the Lenoxholdings transaction. [8
Major commissions[edit]

The White House has used Gorham silver services during many administrations. Mary Todd Lincoln purchased an impressive tea and flatware service for use in the White House in 1859. The tea service was presented to the National Museum of American History in 1957. [9] Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant asked Gorham to commemorate the country's one-hundredth anniversary with a spectacular Century Vase that contained over 2, 000 oz (57, 000 g) of sterling silver, and in 1899, it produced a grand "loving cup" composed of 70, 000 dimes was designed for Admiral George Dewey. Colonel Henry Jewett Furber, president of Universal Life Insurance Company of New York, placed the largest single commission Gorham ever received for what became known as the famous Furber service. The opulent 740-piece service represents Victorian era dining at its most elaborate. The monumental silver and parcel-gilt "Neptune" epergne made for Furber as part of this service was displayed at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. Textron donated a large portion of the service along with other pieces to the Rhode Island School of Design Museum and they are on display in the permanent collection of American decorative arts. [10] In 1907, Gorham created an elaborate silver service for the battleship USS Rhode Island. When the Rhode Island was decommissioned following WWI, the US Navy returned the service to the State for public display. It is now on display in the State Room of the Rhode Island State House. [11] The George W. Bush family chose Gorham's Chantilly as the flatware service on Air Force One.

Gorham artisans also sculpted the famous monument of George Washington in the Capitol's Rotunda, the statue of Theodore Roosevelt that overlooks the Museum of Natural History in New York, and the famous Independent Man which tops the Rhode Island State House.

Gorham designed a number of elaborate trophies for sporting events, including the Borg-Warner Trophy for the Indianapolis 500, designed by Robert J. Hill.

Lions have been an important symbol for thousands of years and appear as a theme in cultures across Europe, Asia, and Africa. Despite the recorded incidents of attacks on humans, lions enjoy positive depiction in popular culture and art the world wide as creatures that appear strong, but gentle at the same time. The most consistent depiction is in keeping with their image of "king of the jungle" or "king of the beasts", hence lions are popular symbols of royalty and stateliness and a symbol of bravery.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

1,995

Here is a very nice all WILKINSON table lamp. The 17"shade has a very unusual overlay design, organic. All high grade glass is original, free of any cracks or chips of repairs. Notice the red accent color at the border, really performs nicely. The base has it;s original patina and hardware. 3HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls. Is very heavy and appears to be bronze, as shown in the hilites. is properly signed as shown. selling low at $1995.

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN
1909 AT 45 YORK ST. BROOKLYN, NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE
TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE
BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS. THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS
OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO. INTO
BANKRUPTCY IN 1915.


Handel Oak Leaf

295

Here is a nice HANDEL table lamp. The 10" shade has oak leaves and throws of beautiful amber color. Shade is not signed. Free of any chips, cracks or any damage.

The 21" Handel lamp base is properly signed as shown and is the HANDEL. Very Low price for a nice HANDEL lamp.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Frank Art Lamp

450

Here is a nice FRANK ART lamp. Original finish, which is a common color with the FRANL ART lamps. Solid piece and works well. measures 15" high with a mica shade measuring 8" x 4".

As I noted on my "Art Deco and the 1920's" page, the Art Deco movement inspired all facets of American lifestyle. Gone were the sentimental decorations and ghosts of the past. Newspapers, radio, magazines and newsreels opened the world to American audiences, who found it easier to learn of worldwide news and events.
*
In Egypt, on November 4, 1922, Howard Carter's workmen found a hidden step near the base of the tomb of Ramses VI. Carter had discovered not just an unknown ancient Egyptian tomb but one nearly undisturbed for over 3, 000 years. It was that of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, the Boy King. Artists, fashion designers, sculptors and others incorporated this Egyptian influence in their own work.
*
This is very evident in Arthur von Frankenberg's designs as he added progressions of stepped-up tiers to the bases of his nymphs. Similarly, other companies providing figural decorative arts such as Ronson, Betty Beck and Nuart added similar designs to their figural accessories. Not only was Art Deco flexible enough to incorporate Egyptian motifs but Oriental, African, Mayan, and Native American designs were also used.


Handel Tree Mica

1,275

Here is a nice HANDEL table lamp with 17" mica shade which throws that beautiful, soft and romantic coppery lite. This is the rare HANDEL tree base. Stands a proud 24" high and has great patina and all its original hardware and properly identified and signed. Three HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls and rewired for another century of dependable service. Super lamp and very low price.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Birds In Flight

8,550

Here is a super rare birds in flight HANDEL table lamp. Measures 18" shade x 24" high. Shade and base both properly signed and shade by Joseph Palme. The trees and birds are magnificently done, all hand painted with chipped ice exterior. Free of any chips or damage of any sort. One of HANDEL'S most nicely and important lamps. The base is 24" high and known as the Chinese priced foot. Found with the up scale HANDEL lamps. All original patina, 3 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Rewired for another century of dependable service. Priced low at $6450.

HANDEL LAMP CO. HISTORY

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Small Desk Lamp

225

Here is a nice table lamp. made for a piano, desk or dresser. Nicely done, but not signed but may well be a Emeralite.


Shades With Sunflowers

195

Here is a set of four, delitful small shades with sunflowers. Just as cute as a bugs ear. All old and in excellent condiyion. Colors are hand painted and strong, sunflowers are great. Notice the convoluted surface "wrinkle " which catches the lite and performs. Measure 4" x 3 1/2" x 1 1/8 fitter. $195 for the complete set of four.


Handel Medium Size Table Lamp

395

Here is a nice medium size table lamp. Great original glass, free of damage and throws off beautiful lite. The base stands 17. 5" high and is signed HANDEL with HUBBELL socket and acorn chain pull.
The shade measures 14" point to point. All overlay is good. Shade is not signed. Priced low to sell.

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Handel Big Base

1,775

Here is a very nice and hugh HANDEL bronzed lamp base. Stands a whopping 29. 5" high w 7" wide. Has 3 HUBBELL sockets. Notice the acanthus leaves ascending the sides and repeats in original patina with hints of verdigris. . if you have a big 24" HANDEL shade, this is the base for you. Has the 5" standard size HANDEL tee pee shade support / heat cap. low to sell.


HANDEL LAMP CO. HISTORY

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand


Handel Hanger

5,400

Here is a really nice HANDEL hanging lamp. perhaps the largest shade that HANDEL made at 28". beautiful design and great workmanship. This style looped brick work of HANDEL lamp is found in the HANDEL books. The shade has the typical HANDEL brass tag inside. The hooks and chain are also signed HANDEL. Hands 54" with the heavy brass chain adjustable. A real and rare piece of American lamp/art history. Very moderately priced at $5, 400.

HANDEL LAMP CO. HISTORY
Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Leaded Glass Table Lamp

550

Hear is a very nice early leaded glass table lamp believer to be made by the UNIQUE LAMP CO. Albeit not signed. Performs well and has HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls. A few minor heat lines in the glass.

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Unique Table Lamp

675

Here is a nice UNIQUE table lamp. Measures 20" x 15". Not signed but identified as a UNIQUE lamp. Very nice glass and design, performs really well. has a few tight heat lines. Has HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls.

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Bradley And Hubbard Table Lamp

995

Here is a nice large BRADLEY AND HUBBARD table lamps. Nicely done and full of flowers. measures 27" high x 20" shade. 3 old original sockets and acorn chain pulls. Has a few cracks in the glass. Selling low at $995.


A Brief Company History
1852-1940
<<
The partnership of
Nathaniel and William L. Bradley, Walter Hubbard, and Orson and Chitten
Hatch began in Meriden, Connecticut in1852 as Bradley, Hatch &
Company. Clocks were the sole product of the newly formed
company.
When the Hatch
brothers sold their interests in the firm two years later, Nathaniel
Bradley, William Bradley and Walter Hubbard formed a company which they
named simply Bradley and Hubbard. By 1856, they were producing
call bells and sewing machines, but clocks continued to be the main line
of production throughout the 1850's and 1860's.
Many northern
manufacturers prospered immensely during the Civil War due to the
expanded market west of the Mississippi and increased foreign exports.
Bradley and Hubbard was no exception, adding the production of
flags, hoop skirts, spring measuring tapes and match safes during the
war years.
The discovery of oil
in Pennsylvania in 1859 also had a great impact on the product line of
Bradley & Hubbard with the decision to begin production of kerosene
burning lamps. By 1871, kerosene virtually replaced whale oil for
heating and illumination and new ways of burning it more efficiently
were needed. Between 1868 and 1875, Bradley and Hubbard secured 33
patents relating to the design and mechanics of oil burning lamps (in
all, the company would eventually patent a total of 238 designs and
mechanical devices). The company was again reorganized in 1875, this
time as a joint stock company renamed The Bradley and Hubbard
Manufacturing Company. >>

The Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company
factory complex, ca1880.
<<
Growing rapidly
throughout the 1880's, the company added new products such as
architectural grilles, railings, fences, window guards, and elevator
enclosures. By the 1890's, the Bradley and Hubbard name was synonymous
with high quality and artistic merit. Their products were marketed not
only in their own showrooms in New York, Boston, Chicago and
Philadelphia, but also by a force of salesmen traveling throughout the
country and by the large retail firms of Marshall Field & Company,
Sears and Roebuck & Company, and Montgomery Ward &
Company.
The Bradley and
Hubbard Manufacturing Company survived the Great Depression, but after
88 years in business, it was sold in 1940 to the Charles Parker
Company, also of Meriden. Famous for its Parker sporting shotgun,
the company also made household items such as coffee mills, waffle
irons, lamps, locks, and door knockers. Upon the acquisition of the
Bradley and Hubbard factories, the Parker Company instituted its
Bradley and Hubbard Division with the stated intent of carrying
on production of some products of the former company such as bathroom
accessories, lighting fixtures, architectural bronzes and brass work.
Within a year and a half after the purchase, the United States entered
into WWII and the Parker Company turned its attention to the war effort.
As the war escalated, all metal production was diverted to war related
goods, making it unlikely that much, if anything, from the Bradley and
Hubbard line was produced, unless for military use. By 1950, all
references to a Bradley and Hubbard Division of the Parker Company had
been dropped from the company's literature.
Finally, in 1976, a
spectacular blaze totally destroyed the long abandoned Bradley and
Hubbard factory buildings. Any records of the old Bradley and Hubbard
Manufacturing Company that were still in the building at the time were
either burned or lost in the rubble when the shell was afterwards
demolished. >>


1920's Lamp

135

Here is a nice old circa 1920 lamp made for a piano or roll top desk. Measures 11" x 9". Very interesting lamp. Bulb is inside and casts lite whereever it's wanted and fully adjustable. Not signed however very heavy brass with nice patina.


Classique Table Lamp

1,475

Here is a very table lamp made by and signed CLASSIQUE. Measures 21. 5" high x 18" shade. The base is heavy bronze, great original patina with the stylized Greek Key around the base in two places as shown and properly signed. The shade is hand reverse painted with leaves and berrys. Great detail and artistry with good natural colors has Bryant sockets with acorn chain pulls.

Classique Lamp Co. a popular and high quality lamp company was in
Chicago for many years at the turn of the century and was known for their high
quality lamps. The reverse scenic painting was done in the dimple "heavy applied
paint" style. Great attention to detail in their high quality shades and
outstanding bases which were distinctive.

GREEK KEY HSITORY

greek key meander

The meander motif took its name from the river Meander, a river with many twists, mentioned by Homer in Iliad. The motif is also known as Greek key or Greek fret.

Meander was the most important symbol in Ancient Greece, symbolizing infinity or the eternal flow of things. Many temples and objects were decorated with this motif, and it is considered that there is a connection with the Cretan labyrinth - indeed - a labyrinth can be drawn using a Greek key.

Meander symbolizes as well the bonds of friendship, of love and devotion and that's the reason it's often given as marriage gift. It can symbolize as well the four cardinal points, the 4 seasons, waves - especially in the round version of it, or snakes, among others.


Parrot Handel Boudoir Lamp

950

Here is a very nice and rear parrot HANDEL boudoir lamp. Stands 15" high with a signed 7" shade. Beautiful and great colors and artistry. The shade is signed however the base is not but identified in the HANDEL books. Has the HUBBELL socket, works well and very low price.


Pairpoing Alabaster Lamp

475

Here is a super. TOTALLY DECO lamp. Made of alabaster and metal with ivory carved faces. , cold painted figures. measures 12. 5" x 11. 5". In excellent original condition. Throws off very nice lite as it comes thru the alabaster. makes a beautiful nite lite. Is signed PAIRPOINT.

PAIRPOINT HISTORY

"Be it known that I, ALBERT STEFFIN, a citizen of the United
States, residing at New Bedford. in the county of Bristol and State of
Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful improvements in the
Manufacture of Glass Shades and Screens, of which the following is a
specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawing. The object of my
invention is to provide articles of different forms for different purposes, such
as shades for covering lamps and screens for admitting light which articles are
mad up of numerous pieces of molded glass, each piece of glass being shaped with
irregular raised surface, and the entire article being a harmonious combination
of the various molded pieces. . . "


Background and History
Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880
in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first
made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington
Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring
synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s,
lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production.
There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy -
blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse
painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually
executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally).
Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic
shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower
inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp. , 2) Patent Pending, 3)
Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were
frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted
effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse
painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a
perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.

Bases were made of bronze,
copper, brass, silver, or wood, and are always signed. As with most all makers
of luxury goods, the company's sales lagged seriously during the Depression, and
over time they lost touch with the changing tastes and styles of the public to
some degree. Consequently, Pairpoint continued to experience financial
difficulties, and some buildings and equipment were sold in 1938. The company
reorganized in 1939 under the direction of Robert Gundersen and again
specialized in quality hand-blown glassware. Isaac Babbit regained possession of
the silver departments, and together they established Gundersen Glassworks, Inc.
Following the end of WWII and after a sharp decline in sales, it again became
necessary to reorganize yet again. The Gundersen-Pairpoint Glassworks was
formed, and the old line of cut, engraved artware was reintroduced. The company
moved to East Wareham, Massachusetts in 1957. Business continued to be poor, and
the firm closed early in 1958. In 1970, Robert Bryden, sales manager for the
company since the 1950s, tried to reestablish Pairpoint and new facilities were
constructed in Sagamore. In 1974, the company began to produce lead glass cup
plates which were made on commission as fund-raisers for various churches and
organizations. These are signed with a 'P' in diamond and are becoming quite
collectible.
The Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880 in New Bedford,
MA. Producing coffin fittings and metalwork, Pairpoint approached its neighbor,
Mt. Washington Glassworks, about a possible merger. Combining metalwork and
glassware production in 1894, their merger created lamp and lamp accessories
including the well known Pairpoint lamps.


Pittsburgh Palm Tree Lamp

1,195

Here is a nice PITTSBURGH palm tree lamp. Shade is 18" with a lot of nice hand painted palms. very nice shade with two small rim chips as shown.
The base is the PITTSBURGH owl base, in original patina, sockets and pulls and properly signed.

PILABRASCO "PITTSBURGH LAMP AND BRASS CO.
PILABRASCO ".

THE PITTSBURGH " PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, A
CHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFUL
LAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THE
UPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TO
THE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Iron Floor Lamp

395

Here is a nice old iron floor lamp, art nouveau. measures 63" high with a nice 7. 5" shade with flowers in full bloom and butterflies. selling low at $395.


Egyptian Barge Dresser Lamp

75

Here is a nice desk/dresser lamp. Egyptian barge with lite and person rowing. Measures 12" long x 7" high at the top of the original frosted glass cylinder shade. Cold painted with good detail.


Unique Table Lamp

1,250

Here is a very nice UNIQUE LAMP CO. table lamp. Measures 18" shade and 25" high. All good with no damage Selling low at $1250.

UNIQUE LAMP CO. HISTORY

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. . THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN LIGHTING / ART HISTORY.


Classique Table Lamp

1275

Here is a nice CLASSIQUE LAMP CO lamp. The shade is 18" with hand painted peacocks, nicely done with good detail and artistry. Free of any damage.
The 24" base is bronze, properly signed and original.

CLASSIQUE LAMP CO. HISTORY

Classique Lamp Co. a popular and high quality lamp company was in
Chicago for many years at the turn of the century and was known for their high
quality lamps. The reverse scenic painting was done in the dimple "heavy applied
paint" style. Great attention to detail in their high quality shades and
outstanding bases which were distinctive.


Spider Web Shade

1150

Here is a nice leadedglass floor lamp. The Lions foot base stands 63" high and has a four socket cluster with good old sockets and acorn chain pulls and has been rewired. The 20" x 10" shade has that beautiful sprider web style, in very good old original condition. Lamp is not signed however is complete. Priced low to sell.


Wood Arts And Crafts

250

Here is a totally arts and crafts, wood table lamp with beautiful design. has good amber glass, works well. Measures 15" shade x 23" high.


Manhatten Table Lamp

275

Here is a nice old table lamp. Has a 8" original tamoshanter shade and stands 21"high. Was once a keroseen/ oil lamp and was nice converted to electric. Is very early with the following
MANHATTEN BRASS CO patent dates, May 23 1876, Dec. 25th 1877, May 20 1879
Priced low to sell.


Green Unique Table Lamp

875

Here is a nice green panel table lamp by UNIQUE. The paneled 15" shade has great high quality glass with one small crack in one corner as shown. The brass base measures 22" high and stable 9" wide at the foot. All hardware is good and rewired.

THE UNIQUE CO WAS STARTED IN 1889 BY GEORGE W. BAILEY AND HELD MANY PATENTS
AND WAS LOCATED AT 46 PARK PLACE NEW YORK. THEY HAD HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN TWO PLANTS IN NEW YORK. THE 3 YEARS FROM 1905 AND 1907 WERE THE
HIGH WATER MARK FOR THE CO. A PERIOD OF ECONOMIC OPTIMISM WHEN THE PUBLICS
APPETITE FOR EXPENSIVE LIGHTING WAS AT IT'S PEAK. THE CO. EXECUTED VERY ELABORATE
SHADES WITH THE MEAN SALES PRICE OF $35. IN 1917 THE WAINING DEPRESSION YEARS,
THE CO. WENT OUT OF BUSINESS. HERE IS A CHANCE TO OWN AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF
AMERICAN ART HISTORY.


Greek Key Wall Sconces

475


Here is a nice solid brass GREEK KEY wall sconces with beautiful iridescent 9" shades. 17" over height. Throws off beautiful lite. Not signed but complete.


Hammered Wall Sconces

325

Here is a nice pair of hammered copper wall sconces, albeit not signed, sure look like HANDEL, good and old. They have nice amber glass. measure 12" high x 6" wide.


Aladdin Boudoir Lamp

250

Here is a nice ALADDIN boudoir lamp. Signed twice and ready to go. Has a 6" shade and stands 14" high, works well. Low priced.

History of Aladdin Lamps

Written by J. W. Courter
"Nearly a century ago, a very small boy on a Nebraska farm read and re-read the Arabian Nights story of Aladdin in a room of darkness but for the flickering yellow light of an open flame "coal oil lamp. " Several years later that boy, grown to manhood, found a lamp that erased the darkness with a soft white light and it was only natural that he named the lamp "Aladdin. " An appropriate name, indeed, for this revolutionary boon to rural America seemed nothing short of magical in the intensity of its light.

"For those who lit the lamp, trimmed its wick and cleaned its chimney, or just enjoyed its friendly glow, the Aladdin lamp recalls many memories of golden childhood. It made learning possible for many boys and girls; made it possible for them to acquire knowledge that helped them realize their dreams and aspirations.

"Later, Aladdin brought this white light to every kind of habitat in every corner of the globe. For many, it has been the only light of their entire life. Even when electricity comes, there are a loyal few who profess to use the electric light only "to find the match" to light their Aladdin. "

V. S. Johnson, Jr
Copyright 2002 by J. W. Courter
J. W. Courter is professor emeritus, University of Illinois. His avocation is collecting and studying oil lamps. He writes and publishes books about Aladdin lamps.
The Trademark Aladdin and Lox-On are used under license from Aladdin Industries, LLC.

Victor Johnson founded the Mantle Lamp Company of America in Chicago in 1908 and imported the Practicus incandescent burner from Germany. He obtained the Aladdin trademark in 1908 and sold the first model of the American-made Aladdin lamp in 1909. In 1926 Johnson bought the Lippincott Glass factory in Alexandria, Indiana to make glass lamps, chimneys and shades, changing the name to Aladdin Industries.

Agents were recruited to sell lamps throughout the country and farm land. They demonstrated the Aladdin and often left the lamp in the home for an overnight trial. The agent arranged for local merchants to stock supplies. In 1928 the company turned solely to franchise dealers-some 15, 000 in the early 1930s. The company advertised extensively in newspapers and through radio.

Smilin Ed McConnell was so popular that he became the "Aladdin lamp man. " In 1949 the company moved their central office from Chicago to Nashville, Tennessee, the home of Aladdin Industries' today. Aladdin lamps were made in the USA until 1963, after which brass lamps were imported from England. Only the glass lamps continued to be made in the USA. Since 1977 the Aladdin burners have been manufactured in Hong Kong while the fonts are made in the USA and England. Chimneys, wicks and mantles are made in other countries today.

In 1999 Aladdin Industries sold the lamp division to collector/investors who named their company Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company, located in Clarksville, Tennessee.

Watson hardware store, Golconda, Illinois, 1937. Very Brief History Colorful Short Lincoln Drape Aladdin lamps are available from the Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company today. "Wireless" World's Finest Non-Electric Lamp Indeed! The Aladdin lamp was developed through application of scientific principles:

Ami Argand, 1750-1803, invented the principle of center draft whereby air is provided inside a tubular wick to the flame of a lamp. Argand's "air lamps" became known as "Argand lamps, " which he first patented in England in 1784.

Dr. Auer von Welsbach, 1858-1929, an Austrian chemist, invented the incandescent gas mantle in 1885, a huge improvement in the history of artificial lighting. The early technology of adapting the mantle to oil lamps was developed in Germany.

Beginning in the early 1900s companies in the United States recognized the tremendous advantage of these improved lights. The Aladdin lamp became the world-wide leader in non-pressure incandescent lamps during the next 50 years.


Wilkinson Table Lamp

2,350

Here is a very Nice Wilkinson Table lamp. WILKINSON WATERLILLY. Measures 21. 5" high x 16. 5" wide.
Nice bronzed base, excellent details, early socket, rewired for another century of dependable service. Great patina matching in the shade and base. Note, this WILKINSON lamp is found on page #244 and #267of the Paul Crist Mosaic Slades II book.
The shade has high quality glass with a great selection of well coordinated colors and super workmanship that made the Wilkinson Co. Famous.

ELMER WILKINSON BORN IN CANADA IN 1860 STARTED HIS LAMP BUSINESS IN
1909 AT 45 YORK ST. BROOKLYN, NY. WITH FACTORY ON 8TH AVE. WILKINSON WAS ABLE
TO BRING A NEW LEVEL OF HIGH QUALITY AND WORKMANSHIP TO THE LAMP INDUSTRY WHILE
BOASTING A FULL COMPLIMENT OF EXCELLENT LAMPS. THE COMPANY ENJOYED SEVERAL YEARS
OF HIGH OUTPUT AND SALES. THE DOWNTURN IN NATIONAL ECONOMY FORCED THE CO. INTO
BANKRUPTCY IN 1915.


Duffner And Kimberly Table Lamp

8,950

Here is a monumental DUFFNER and KIMBERLY table lamp. Measures a whopping 26" shade x 33. 5" high. High and beautiful lamp. Has the six socket cluster and acorn chain pulls. Nice original lamp By Duffner.

THE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY LAMP CO. STARTED IN NEW YORK, 11 WEST WEST 32ND
STREET, IN 1905 BY FRANK DUFFNER AND OLIVER KIMBERLY AND THE VERY TALENTED
DESIGNER H. T. HOWARD.
D&K COMPANIES PHILOSOPHY WAS TO OFFER LIGHTING
FIXTURES IN THE PUREST PERIOD STYLES FOR THE FINEST RESIDENCES THEY CHOSE TO
COMPETE DIRECTLY AGAINST TIFFANY STUDIOS. WHY IS SO LITTLE KNOWN ABOUT THIS FINE
CO ? D&K EXISTED FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF TIME, 1905 BUT BY 1913 WENT BANKRUPT.
THE RECESSION OF 1908 BADLY HURT SALES FOR OPULENT EXPENSIVE ITEMS. IN 1906 THE
D&K WISTERIA FLOOR LAMP COST $550 WHILE THE TIFFANY STUDIOS WISTERIA SOLD
FOR $480. NOTE, BY COMPARISON A NEW MODEL A FORD OF THAT YEAR COST $450. TODAY
D&K LAMPS ARE LIKE TIFFANY STUDIOS, HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND IN GREAT DEMAND
WHILE COMMANDING HIGH PRICES. VERY LITTLE PRINTED INFORMATION IS KNOWN TO EXIST.
THIS BASE HAS THE RARE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY METAL TAG ON THE BOTTOM


Gorham Table Lamp

775

Here is a nice Gorham table lamp. Really outstanding high quality glass with the "cats paw" textured glass that really performs nicely. Great color coordination that Gorham is known for. The shade measures 14" diameter.
The base is bronze with applied "very rare" vines and leaves ascending. Stands 20" high, has the typical hardware for Gorham and the 1 3/9" aperture which is exclusive to Gorhan. Low price.

The Gorham Mfg. Co. stands out as the only firm to
outdo Tiffany in the ostentation of their work. Perhaps because they were
already accomplished in bronze and silver work, they added a leaded shade studio
in 1905. This impressive colonial model is one of their most elaborate
creations. The shade is made up of over 3000 individual pieces of glass, far
surpassing anything Tiffany attempted at a comparable scale. (28 inches high by
22 inches in diameter)


Pairpoint Flowered Table Lamp

875

Here is a nice Pairpoint flowered table lamp. Measures 17" high with the typical 10" fitter. The shade outside diameter is 11. 5" at the overhang. The base has fair patina, is properly signed, 4 arm spider shade support with 2 early 2 screw HUBBELL sockets and rewired.
The shade, albeit signed THE PAIRPOINT CO" is blown in deep relief in flowers in full bloom. A word of caution here. Although beautiful, I do believe the shade was made by the Consuladed lamp co. and somehow attracted the signature along the line. I am pricing as a Consuladed shade.


Tiffany Quazal Table Lamp

5,350

Here is a really nice TIFFANY table lamp. Asnice as it gets. Early lamp, properly signed TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YOUR #28000. Has it's original patina with all correct hardware and rewired. Stands 12" high x 7"at the foot, solid bronze. The shade id the iridenscent 5. 5" Quazal in excellent condition. Throws off the iridenscent, romantic, coppery light.


Handel Floor Lamp

5,875

Here is a nice HANDEL floor lamp. Stands 5, 4'high, has the tee pee shade support, 4 swan neck Hubbell sockets with acorn chain pulls. has the impressed HANDEL signature on the bottom of the foot. Great verdigris patina, rewired for another century of dependable. Very heavy, solid bronze.
The 17" shade flowers in full bloom with the brick work glass Properly signed inside the shade and on the shade ring with pat end number.

HANDEL HISTORY

Philip Handel joined in partnership with Adolph Eydam in
1885 to form the Eydam and Handel Company in Meriden, Connecticut. When this
partnership dissolved in 1892, the remaining company was relocated to larger
facilities and was thereafter known as Philip J. Handel and then as Handel
and Company. The Handel Company originally incorporated
on June 11, 1903 with Philip J. Handel, Albert Parlow, and Antone
Teich as the primary officers. Philip J. Handel married his
second wife, Fannie Hirschfield Handel, in 1906, and she became company
President upon Philip Handels death in 1914. She would remarry (Fannie Handel
Turner) in 1918 and managerial control of the company soon passed to
William F. Handel, Philips cousin. The immediate post World War I period was
one of tremendous growth and profitability for The Handel Company. However, the
economic slowdown of the late 1920s and resulting Great Depression had a
devastating effect on company fortunes. By 1929, most production had ceased, and
manufacturing ended all together in 1936. In Handel's hayday, they produced
many types of high quality lamps which are in high demand.


Bradley And Hubbard Nouveau Lamp

375

Here for your consideration is a beautiful art nouveau lamp by Bradley and Hubbard. measures 11" shade x 14" high with 6 panels of high grade glass. Color is a white, lite amber all in good condition free of cracks or damage. Has really cool hardware with Saturn acorn pull with original safety insulator.

A Brief Company History
1852-1940
<<
The partnership of
Nathaniel and William L. Bradley, Walter Hubbard, and Orson and Chitten
Hatch began in Meriden, Connecticut in1852 as Bradley, Hatch &
Company. Clocks were the sole product of the newly formed
company.
When the Hatch
brothers sold their interests in the firm two years later, Nathaniel
Bradley, William Bradley and Walter Hubbard formed a company which they
named simply Bradley and Hubbard. By 1856, they were producing
call bells and sewing machines, but clocks continued to be the main line
of production throughout the 1850's and 1860's.
Many northern
manufacturers prospered immensely during the Civil War due to the
expanded market west of the Mississippi and increased foreign exports.
Bradley and Hubbard was no exception, adding the production of
flags, hoop skirts, spring measuring tapes and match safes during the
war years.
The discovery of oil
in Pennsylvania in 1859 also had a great impact on the product line of
Bradley & Hubbard with the decision to begin production of kerosene
burning lamps. By 1871, kerosene virtually replaced whale oil for
heating and illumination and new ways of burning it more efficiently
were needed. Between 1868 and 1875, Bradley and Hubbard secured 33
patents relating to the design and mechanics of oil burning lamps (in
all, the company would eventually patent a total of 238 designs and
mechanical devices). The company was again reorganized in 1875, this
time as a joint stock company renamed The Bradley and Hubbard
Manufacturing Company. >>

The Bradley and Hubbard Manufacturing Company
factory complex, ca1880.
<<
Growing rapidly
throughout the 1880's, the company added new products such as
architectural grilles, railings, fences, window guards, and elevator
enclosures. By the 1890's, the Bradley and Hubbard name was synonymous
with high quality and artistic merit. Their products were marketed not
only in their own showrooms in New York, Boston, Chicago and
Philadelphia, but also by a force of salesmen traveling throughout the
country and by the large retail firms of Marshall Field & Company,
Sears and Roebuck & Company, and Montgomery Ward &
Company.
The Bradley and
Hubbard Manufacturing Company survived the Great Depression, but after
88 years in business, it was sold in 1940 to the Charles Parker
Company, also of Meriden. Famous for its Parker sporting shotgun,
the company also made household items such as coffee mills, waffle
irons, lamps, locks, and door knockers. Upon the acquisition of the
Bradley and Hubbard factories, the Parker Company instituted its
Bradley and Hubbard Division with the stated intent of carrying
on production of some products of the former company such as bathroom
accessories, lighting fixtures, architectural bronzes and brass work.
Within a year and a half after the purchase, the United States entered
into WWII and the Parker Company turned its attention to the war effort.
As the war escalated, all metal production was diverted to war related
goods, making it unlikely that much, if anything, from the Bradley and
Hubbard line was produced, unless for military use. By 1950, all
references to a Bradley and Hubbard Division of the Parker Company had
been dropped from the company's literature.
Finally, in 1976, a
spectacular blaze totally destroyed the long abandoned Bradley and
Hubbard factory buildings. Any records of the old Bradley and Hubbard
Manufacturing Company that were still in the building at the time were
either burned or lost in the rubble when the shell was afterwards
demolished.


Pairpoint Gull

6,550

Here is a super rare Pairpoint Gull, nautical lamp. Is a massive 25" high x 20" dia. shade, fully signed and artist signed. Colors and artistry are supurb. All original hardware and works well with lighted base as well, which can be used as a beautiful nite lite as well. This really outstanding and rare lamp has fetched much more then the $6550 here. A true and important piece of American lighting / art history.



Background and History
Pairpoint Manufacturing Company was established in 1880
in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The factory began as a metalworks which first
made fittings for coffins. Near the Pairpoint factory was the Mt. Washington
Glassworks which made fine glassware, and the two companies began exploring
synergies culminating in a merger in 1894. From the late 1890s until the 1930s,
lamps and lamp accessories were an important part of Pairpoint's production.
There were three main types of shades, all of which were blown: puffy -
blown-out reverse-painted shades (usually floral designs); ribbed - also reverse
painted; and scenic - reverse painted with scenes of land or seascapes (usually
executed on smooth surfaces, although ribbed scenics may be found occasionally).
Cut glass lamps and those with metal overlay panels were also made. Scenic
shades were sometimes artist signed. Most shades were stamped on the lower
inside or outside edge with either 1) The Pairpoint Corp. , 2) Patent Pending, 3)
Patented July 9, 1907, or 4) Patent Applied For. All Pairpoint shades were
frosted through an acid process prior to painting, and the reverse painted
effects required a great deal of talent on the part of the artist. Reverse
painting combined the skills of watercolor painting and glassmaking with a
perception of how light would play through the glass and paint when lit.


Handel Students Lamp

995

Here for your consideration is a properly signed and authentic HANDEL double students lamp. measures 24" high x 18" wide, all brass and works well. Outstanding glass.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Pittsburgh Indian Encampment

3,250

Here for your consideration is the PITTSBURGH "INDIAN ENCAMPMENT ". By far and away the rarest and sought after of all the lamps by PITTSBURGH. Stands 22" high x 16" shade. Please notice a remittent of the original paper signature tag is still in the shade. RARE. The base is the special "OWL" In very good original condition. The base is properly signed on top of the foot weight. This is an antique and has the patina of a century of service. I have taken many pics. This lamp has fetched as high as $4500 in years past. This beauty is $3250. 00

PILABRASCO "PITTSBURGH LAMP AND BRASS CO.
PILABRASCO ".

THE PITTSBURGH " PILABRASCO" CO. WAS STARTED BY NICHOLAS KOPP IN 1900, A
CHEMIST KNOWN FOR HIS KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO HAND MOLD AND COLOR BEAUTIFUL
LAMPS THAT WERE VERY POPULAR UNTIL 1926, WHEN THE COMPANY BANKRUPTED. NOW THE
UPPER END PITTSBURGH LAMPS ARE POPULAR AND COMMAND HIGH PRICES. BRINGS JOY TO
THE HOME EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR.


Handel Boudoir 6457

2,450

Here for your consideration is a very rare HANDEL boudoir lamp. Fully signed base and shade #6457. This is the super rare molded glass shade. Full of flowers in bloom and butterfly's in flight. Free of any damage or repairs, Artistry and strong colors are the best ever. Original patina and is the Pond Lilly style with Hubbell socket and acorn chain pull. Has been properly rewired for another near century of dependable service. Like having a bouquet of fresh flowers on the table every day. Reduced of sale $2450.

The Handel Lamp Company of Meriden, Connecticut began production in 1885 as
a partnership between Philip Julius Handel, age nineteen, and Adolph Eydam, age
twenty-one. The company, founded as Eydam & Handel first specialized in
glass decorating and lamp manufacturing using bases from other suppliers. The
company began the production of their own lamp bases in 1902 with the opening of
the Handel foundry, allowing production of the lamps completely "In house". The
lamps were made in a variety sizes that ranged from boudoir to floor lamps to
18" diameter table lamps. The company is best known for their reverse painted
lamps, hand painted with a wide array of beautiful lamps with subjects ranging
from historical scenes to birds, flowers and butterflies. No two lamps
even with the same design number by the same artist were ever identical, the
success of each lamp depended largely on the ability of the artist. There are
better examples of each design number, usually the ones signed by the artist
bringing a premium value over unsigned shades. The company ceased
production in 1936 as the demand for Art Nouveau and Arts & Crafts style
faded. In today's market all Handel lamps are highly sought after with prices
ranging from $2000. 00 dollars for lamps with simpler designs to over $100, 000
for extreme rarities with "One of a kind" variations on a design
theme.


Handel Bronze Base

1,950

Here for your consideration is a real and rare HANDEL BRONZE LAMP BASE in the tree trunk. Measures 23" and complete with 3 HUBBELL sockets and acorn chain pulls. Rewired for another century of service.


Roycroft Ceiling Light

5,875

VINTAGE HAND HAMMERED COPPER ROYCROFT CEILING LIGHT WITH ART GLASS SHADES STEUBEN: 5 light arts & crafts ceiling fixture, hand hammered coppered, top with scroll design, 5 rods over lower ring, crimped shade holders. Overall measures 21'' h. excluding shades x 17 1/2''. 5 pulled feather art glass shades by Steuben, 3 1/4'' h. x 6'' dia. , 2 1/2'' fitter rim.
CONDITION: Several very slight chips to fitter rims.

Roycroft was a reformist community of craft workers and artists which
formed part of the Arts and Crafts
movement in the USA. Elbert Hubbard founded
the community in 1895 in the village of East Aurora, Erie County, New
York, near Buffalo. Participants
were known as Roycrofters. The work and philosophy of the group, often
referred to as the Roycroft movement, had a strong influence on the
development of American architecture and design in the early 20th century.
The name Roycroft was chosen after the printers,
Samuel and Thomas Roycroft, who made books in London from about 1650-1690. And
beyond this, the word roycroft had a special significance to Elbert
Hubbard, meaning King's Craft. In guilds of early modern Europe,
king's craftsmen were guild members who had achieved a high degree of skill and
therefore made things for the King. The Roycroft insignia was borrowed from the
monk Cassidorius,

Steuben Glass Works was an American art glass manufacturer, founded in the summer of 1903 by Fredrick C. Carder and Thomas G. Hawkes in Corning, New York, which is in Steuben County, from which the company name was derived. Hawkes was the owner of the largest cut glass firm then operating in Corning. Carder was an Englishman (born 18 September 1863) who had many years' experience designing glass for Stevens and Williams inEngland. Hawkes purchased the glass blanks for his cutting shop from many sources and eventually wanted to start a factory to make the blanks himself. Hawkes convinced Carder to come to Corning and manage such a factory. Carder, who had been passed over for promotion at Stevens and Williams, consented to do so.

In July 2008, Steuben was sold by Corning Incorporated for an undisclosed price to the Schottenstein Stores Corp. , [1] which also owns 51% of Retail Ventures, a holding company for DSW, Filene's Basement, and formerly Value City Department Stores; Value City Furniture, which changed its name to American Signature Furniture; 15% of American Eagle Outfitters, retail liquidator SB Capital Group, some 50 shopping centers, and 5 factories producing its shoes, furniture and crystal.


Unique Table Lamp

975

Almost Excellent condition ! Please ask any questions ! Up for sale is a very unusual art nouveau, arts & crafts or deco design jeweled leaded stained slag glass "wisteria" table lamp, circa 1910-20, s. Nice rich original brown chocolate patina all around of lamp shade, lamp base is bronze patinated metal, two original sockets work very good and with original pull chains. . The dome shape shade has 19" in diameter by 8" high, total size of the lamp is 23. 5", bottom of the lamp base is 8". The slag glass has red, peach, rose, green, yellow colors. Believed to be made by the UNIQUE LAMP CO.
Selling low at $975


Handel Table Lamp

2,875

Here for your consideration is a really great Handel arts and crafts table lamp. Hugh 27" x 20" and heavy hammered copper. Shade and base both properly signed HANDEL with great patina. Has 4 HUBBELL sockets with acorn chain pulls. Correct on all ways.


Duffner And Kimberly Table Lamp

2,975

Here for sale is a very nice DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY table lamp in the arts and crafts style. The shade is 18". the bump base is 24" high with all the correct hardware including four Bryant sockets with saturn pulls. All in excellent condition. $2975, is a low price. This beautiful lamp will bring beauty to any room in ones home. The last pic is from the Paul Crist Mosaic Shades II

THE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY LAMP CO. STARTED IN NEW YORK, 11 WEST WEST 32ND
STREET, IN 1905 BY FRANK DUFFNER AND OLIVER KIMBERLY AND THE VERY TALENTED
DESIGNER H. T. HOWARD.
D&K COMPANIES PHILOSOPHY WAS TO OFFER LIGHTING
FIXTURES IN THE PUREST PERIOD STYLES FOR THE FINEST RESIDENCES THEY CHOSE TO
COMPETE DIRECTLY AGAINST TIFFANY STUDIOS. WHY IS SO LITTLE KNOWN ABOUT THIS FINE
CO ? D&K EXISTED FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF TIME, 1905 BUT BY 1913 WENT BANKRUPT.
THE RECESSION OF 1908 BADLY HURT SALES FOR OPULENT EXPENSIVE ITEMS. IN 1906 THE
D&K WISTERIA FLOOR LAMP COST $550 WHILE THE TIFFANY STUDIOS WISTERIA SOLD
FOR $480. NOTE, BY COMPARISON A NEW MODEL A FORD OF THAT YEAR COST $450. TODAY
D&K LAMPS ARE LIKE TIFFANY STUDIOS, HIGHLY COLLECTABLE AND IN GREAT DEMAND
WHILE COMMANDING HIGH PRICES. VERY LITTLE PRINTED INFORMATION IS KNOWN TO EXIST.
THIS BASE HAS THE RARE DUFFNER AND KIMBERLY METAL TAG ON THE BOTTOM